Video Archive | Form (22)

Odile Decq Beyond Horizon-clip_6049
Decq discusses a project for a restaurant at Charles Garnier's Paris Opera. She reviews the history of the building and the...
Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4813
Elena Manferdini opens the symposium and introduces the panel. She outlines the role of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the...
Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4814
Hernan Diaz Alonso discusses the relevance of student theses within contemporary architectural practice. The panel discusses the...
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor
Benjamin Bratton discusses interface and programming in architecture, proposing a series potential futures based upon the need...
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479
Benjamin Bratton begins his lecture with a discussion of the programmatic potential of new forms, illustrated by the work of...
Hitoshi Abe
Eric Owen Moss introduces Hitoshi Abe as an aspiring poet and an urbanist. Abe declares that he seeks an architecture that...
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1293
During his introduction, Eric Owen Moss refers to Hitoshi Abe as an aspiring poet and an urbanist. Abe is a SCI-Arc graduate who...
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1295
Hitoshi Abe declares that he seeks architecture that functions as an interface between human and environment, much like a...

Odile Decq Beyond Horizon-clip_6049

View the Full Video: Odile Decq Beyond Horizon
October 12, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Decq discusses a project for a restaurant at Charles Garnier’s Paris Opera. She reviews the history of the building and the decision to modify a former carriage entrance for the restaurant. Decq explains her response to the constraints of the project and the struggle between establishing views of the dome from beneath and increasing proximity to the facade at the mezzanine. The form of the mezzanine establishes unique ambiances for the spaces above and below. She goes on to present a French Regional Contemporary Art Funds (FRAC) museum in Rennes, featuring a monumental work by Aur?lie Nemours.


Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4813

View the Full Video: Thesis Prep Symposium
April 6, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Elena Manferdini opens the symposium and introduces the panel. She outlines the role of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the responsibility of students to seriously investigate the architectural implications of their topics. The panel discusses qualities exhibited by a good thesis, noting a balance between innovative ideas and effective communication. Wes Jones inquires about the difference between designers and architects. While conceding the importance of consulting with peers, the panel cautions against being over-influenced by others, and the sameness that results.


Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor

Benjamin Bratton discusses interface and programming in architecture, proposing a series potential futures based upon the need for architecture to disappear. This disappearance is not viewed as an explosive immolation, but as an absorptive melt into a universal design of interaction and filter which will allow for architecture’s rebirth into itself or something else. Bratton’s talk ultimately evades any suggestion of concrete path, instead posing questions for architecture’s disciplinary futures.

Clips

Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1473
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1473
Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Benjamin Bratton, discussing their personal and professional relationship. Diaz Alonso comments on...
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479
Benjamin Bratton begins his lecture with a discussion of the programmatic potential of new forms, illustrated by the work of...
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1494
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1494
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1497
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1497
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1507
Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1507
Bratton claims that there is no architecture without action, event, program or violence, and concludes his lecture with a...

Benjamin Bratton The Program Is Not On The Floor-clip_1479

Subclip

Benjamin Bratton begins his lecture with a discussion of the programmatic potential of new forms, illustrated by the work of Hernan Diaz Alonso. He comments on the speculative real estate bubble and the role that the blob or continuous surface has played in the generation of “architectural hood ornaments” but proposes that these projects are not relics of the past. He describes Diaz Alonso’s work as design for functions that don’t yet exist, incorporating the notion that program is an element of every surface of interaction. This is what makes Diaz Alonso’s work bio-political.


Hitoshi Abe

January 31, 2007 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Eric Owen Moss introduces Hitoshi Abe as an aspiring poet and an urbanist. Abe declares that he seeks an architecture that functions as an interface between human and environment, like a skateboard for a skateboarder. This video ends before Abe ends his lecture.

Clips

Hitoshi Abe-clip_1293
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1293
During his introduction, Eric Owen Moss refers to Hitoshi Abe as an aspiring poet and an urbanist. Abe is a SCI-Arc graduate who...
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1295
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1295
Themes: , , ,
Hitoshi Abe declares that he seeks architecture that functions as an interface between human and environment, much like a...
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1296
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1296
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1298
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1298
Abe discusses the body as an interface that directly engages the environment. He illustrates this with an installation he created...
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1300
Hitoshi Abe-clip_1300

Hitoshi Abe-clip_1295

View the Full Video: Hitoshi Abe
January 31, 2007 | Video Lecturer: ,

Subclip

Hitoshi Abe declares that he seeks architecture that functions as an interface between human and environment, much like a skateboard for a skateboarder. Abe discusses his idea of form, which is not bound by symbolic meaning, but is responsive to its environment. He highlights his concept of form with a project for a bridge handrail, which graced the bridge with symbolism without referring to any specific iconography.