Video Archive | Edmund Husserl (3)

Robert Irwin
Introduced by Coy Howard, Robert Irwin argues that the aesthetics and the issues of art have been radically inverted in the last...
Robert Irwin-clip_1592
Robert Irwin discusses how a renaissance in art is always defined by the point of the highest measurable performance, but that...
Aldo Van Eyck-clip_3242
Aldo van Eyck's presentation is followed by a panel discussion with Christian Norberg-Schulz an an unidentified woman....

Robert Irwin

December 5, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

Introduced by Coy Howard, Robert Irwin argues that the aesthetics and the issues of art have been radically inverted in the last hundred years. He examines how this has brought about a shift in the meaning of the term “art” and the issues and concerns of being an artist. The shift from the pictorial compositions of Jacques-Louis David to work such as that of Kazimir Malevich, is illustrated in the development of Piet Mondrian’s work. In what could be described as phenomenological art, Mondrian’s work develops four principals including change, energy, positive space, and non-hierarchical order. This supports the phenomenological and qualitative way of seeing the world described by Edmund Husserl which is an alternative to Plato and Aristotle’s quantitative world of transcendental truth.

Clips

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Robert Irwin-clip_1589
After describing his struggle to get the right tone, Coy Howard recites a portion of an introduction he wrote for Robert Irwin. ...
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Robert Irwin-clip_1590
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Robert Irwin-clip_1591
Robert Irwin-clip_1592
Robert Irwin-clip_1592
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Robert Irwin-clip_1593
Robert Irwin demonstrates his phenomenological way of viewing the world through the example of a mark on a chalkboard. The mark...

Robert Irwin-clip_1592

View the Full Video: Robert Irwin
December 5, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

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Robert Irwin discusses how a renaissance in art is always defined by the point of the highest measurable performance, but that the point at which doubts arise is equally important. Edmund Husserl employed phenomenological reduction to mediate truth, doubt and contradiction. Another contradiction is fact that consciousness is temporal and spatial, yet cannot be measured or detected quantitatively. For instance, the mind actively forms the world around you through consciousness, but the instantaneousness of this process makes it invisible.


Aldo Van Eyck-clip_3242

View the Full Video: Aldo Van Eyck
January 1, 1985 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Aldo van Eyck’s presentation is followed by a panel discussion with Christian Norberg-Schulz an an unidentified woman. Norberg-Schulz agrees with van Eyck’s premise that modernism was misunderstood, but proposes a phenomenological approach, such as described by Edmund Husserl, that goes beyond an analytic examination by treating objects as things. The unidentified panelist suggests that there’s a connection between van Eyck European Space Agency columns and those used by Robert Venturi. Van Eyck protests, claiming that his columns are the way they are so that people could touch their tops and comments thatVenturi’s suffer from “columnitis.”