Video Archive | Illusions (6)

Claude Parent Part One-clip_3383
Claude Parent lectures in French, and an interpreter provides an English translation. Parent illustrates his ideas by drawing on...
Claude Parent Part One-clip_3388
Parent discusses the future of society, which he sees as a situation in which instability leads to continuity. He argues that...
Fire In The Library Rachel Rosenthal And Richard Terrile...
Eugenia Butler, Richard Terrile, and Rachel Rosenthal discuss different models of the cosmos. Terrile discusses quantum physics...
Sandeep Divekar-clip_970
Divekar begins to explain some of the projects contained within the video. He discusses the implementation of optical illusions...
Antoine Predock And Central Office Of...
Predock describes many built projects, all involving a very close reading of their surroundings. He uses various devices such as...
Mary Alice Dixon Hinson Fabrications-clip_5887
Andrew Zago introduces Mary Alice Dixon-Hinson. She cites the Acropolis and Marc-Antoine Laugier's Primitive Hut as part of an...

Claude Parent Part One-clip_3383

View the Full Video: Claude Parent Part One
October 14, 1998 | Video Lecturer:

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Claude Parent lectures in French, and an interpreter provides an English translation. Parent illustrates his ideas by drawing on paper attached to the wall. Parent stresses the importance of movement in architecture, evoking the ocean and waves as a image of what he is interested in architecture. He calls himself a magician of architecture, and claims he designs illusions. Parent argues that Frank Lloyd Wright and Erich Mendelsohn were the first architects to incorporate the illusion of movement in
architecture.


Claude Parent Part One-clip_3388

View the Full Video: Claude Parent Part One
October 14, 1998 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Parent discusses the future of society, which he sees as a situation in which instability leads to continuity. He argues that modernism focused on the development of surface, instead of development of volume. Parent stresses that architects must invent their own limits, develop without boundaries, and think about habitations in terms of masses, not individuals.


Fire In The Library Rachel Rosenthal And Richard Terrile Part One-clip_4761

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Eugenia Butler, Richard Terrile, and Rachel Rosenthal discuss different models of the cosmos. Terrile discusses quantum physics and the connections between things. Rosenthal discusses illusion, time and how improvisational theater stresses being in the now.


Sandeep Divekar-clip_970

View the Full Video: Sandeep Divekar
February 8, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Divekar begins to explain some of the projects contained within the video. He discusses the implementation of optical illusions within the virtual world in order to achieve a more realistic quality. Architects have the ability to visualize complex spaces, and therefore are in demand within computational professions. Also, computation provides new avenues within the field of architecture. He discusses events in which professionals from varied backgrounds meet to discuss these technologies, specifically virtual reality and human computing interfaces. Divekar briefly discusses the evolution of language from the prehistoric to modern day, where computerized visual language is compared to prehistoric cave paintings.


Antoine Predock And Central Office Of Architecture-clip_4855

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Predock describes many built projects, all involving a very close reading of their surroundings. He uses various devices such as mirrors and surface finishes to heighten awareness of the environment. For a house in Venice California, he uses a rotating window to both open the interior to the exterior, and to emphasize the view to the ocean. His buildings integrate very dramatic spaces with materials and forms that relate to the landscape.


Mary Alice Dixon Hinson Fabrications-clip_5887

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Andrew Zago introduces Mary Alice Dixon-Hinson. She cites the Acropolis and Marc-Antoine Laugier’s Primitive Hut as part of an analysis of rationalist representation in Western cultural history. She reviews the use of perspective in the Renaissance to create illusory space. She examines Piranesi’s etchings, noting the absence of people,and characterizing this as a metaphor for the reality of 18th and 19th century city planning.