Video Archive | Indeterminacy (7)

Eric Bunge CTRL_A
Eric Bunge proposes that his work with Mimi Hoang at nArchitects engages with the differing boundaries of control and...
Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9538
Eric Bunge begins by asking "What are we really in control of?" suggesting that the work of nArchitects engages with the...
Herman Hertzberger-clip_2647
Hertzberger discusses the indeterministic concepts incorporated into the Experimental Houses in Delft, Netherlands. Within this...
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture
Paul Kennon begins the lecture with a description of what architects should be, what abilities they should possess and what...
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233
Kennon discusses the importance of education and curiosity in innovation. He states that architecture should be responsive to the...
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2235
Kennon discusses various projects completed by his firm. He discusses the design methodology utilized within certain projects,...
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2236
Kennon discusses various projects that seek to challenge hierarchies and that utilize concepts of gaming, indeterminacy, and...

Eric Bunge CTRL_A

October 1, 2014 |
Introduction by:

Eric Bunge proposes that his work with Mimi Hoang at nArchitects engages with the differing boundaries of control and indeterminacy. Specifically, he discusses their work under three categories: architecture that adapts to change, architecture that creates interaction between diverse publics, and conceptual and material economy. Projects include the Canopy for PS. 1, My Micro NY compact affordable housing, a visitor center for the Wyckoff House Museum, the Switch Building, the riverfront M2 in Calgary, the ABC department store in Beirut, and a renovation of Chicago’s Navy Pier.

Clips

Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9538
Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9538
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Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9541
Themes:
Eric Bunge discusses projects that demonstrate conceptual and material economy, such as the Switch Building (2007), the M2...

Eric Bunge CTRL_A-clip_9538

View the Full Video: Eric Bunge CTRL_A
October 1, 2014 |

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Eric Bunge begins by asking “What are we really in control of?” suggesting that the work of nArchitects engages with the differing boundaries of control and indeterminacy. He proposes discussing their work in three non-chronological categories: architecture that adapts to change, architecture that creates interaction between diverse publics, and conceptual and material economy.


Herman Hertzberger-clip_2647

View the Full Video: Herman Hertzberger Duplicate
November 14, 1983 | Video Lecturer:

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Hertzberger discusses the indeterministic concepts incorporated into the Experimental Houses in Delft, Netherlands. Within this project, the program is not determined: the residents were provided with a shell in which they could individualize their spaces. He states that it is not the architect’s responsibility to make programmatic decisions, but to create conditions that provide choices. He emphasized the importance of understanding human behavior. And while some homes within this project had a “beautiful sort of awfulness,” he feels that when people are given freedom and responsibility, the create amazing things.


Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture

February 19, 1975 | Video Lecturer:

Paul Kennon begins the lecture with a description of what architects should be, what abilities they should possess and what avenues need further investigation. He states that architecture is problem solving and emphasizes the importance of the concepts of indeterminacy, intermixing, immaterialism, and spatial awareness. He talks about gaming as the process of playing a game in which the typical roles of the team are challenged. He discusses the use of a systems approach, the utilizations for the computer and then goes into discussion of some of their projects, which focus on energy efficiency.

Clips

Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233
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Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2234
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2235
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2235
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2236
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2236

Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233

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Kennon discusses the importance of education and curiosity in innovation. He states that architecture should be responsive to the basic psychological needs of the population. He emphasizes the importance of the paradigm shift of working within a team environment, stating the team should be intellectually and emotionally energetic. He refers to architecture as an extension of human activity and emphasizes the importance of the concept of indeterminacy within architecture to provide a spatial experience. He discusses technology as the means by which the intangible becomes tangible.


Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2235

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Kennon discusses various projects completed by his firm. He discusses the design methodology utilized within certain projects, such as gaming. He also discussed some innovative approaches applied to the New York Philharmonic, implementing computerized ceiling panels. Within the Akron Performing Arts Hall, they reduced the weight of the ceiling utilizing a catenary system, which incorporated stage rigging and located the counterweights in the lobby that served as a sculptural piece. Kennon discusses the implementation of a chassis that provided a functional grid for elements to plug in to for a medical facility interested in keeping spaces flexible.


Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2236

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Kennon discusses various projects that seek to challenge hierarchies and that utilize concepts of gaming, indeterminacy, and energy conservation. In Columbus, Indiana his firm is working on four projects, a school, a bank, a phone company building, and a tennis/golf club. The community school utilized concepts of gaming to develop the program, and incorporated indeterminacy in order to allow the building to serve multiple functions within the community. The bank and phone company building explored the avenues of energy conservation with the incorporation of green elements, while exploiting energy capabilities and challenging norms of human interaction. In the tennis/golf club, they sought to incorporate natural ventilation and a windmill as a supplemental energy conductor.