Video Archive | Innovation (8)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss's SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis describes the seminar, Look! You've got it all wrong! as an attempt to reflect on the issues Eric Owen...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
After a brief outline, Josef Fr?hlich discusses increasing complexity as a necessary and irreversible social trend, presenting...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
Josef Fr?hlich discusses some of the tools useful for guiding complex systems. He stresses social media, describing spatial...
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay
Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki's translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He...
Thomas Daniell Of FOBA-clip_720
Daniell discusses concepts behind innovative housing strategies, utilizing shipping containers as homes. They have an outstanding...
Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233
Kennon discusses the importance of education and curiosity in innovation. He states that architecture should be responsive to the...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1

Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss’s SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as they relate to the students’ imminent engagement with practice. For the first session, the topic is the pleasure of building. Eric Owen Moss responds to the topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, and then discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building, stressing the relationship between design and realization. Kipnis and Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value.

 

 

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Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9520
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Jeffrey Kipnis describes the seminar, Look! You've got it all wrong! as an attempt to reflect on the issues Eric Owen...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9521
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9520

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Jeffrey Kipnis describes the seminar, Look! You’ve got it all wrong! as an attempt to reflect on the issues Eric Owen Moss’s SCI-Arc directorship stressed, as they relate to the students’ imminent engagement with practice (and also referencing Monty Python’s Life of Brian). Kipnis proposes for the topic of the first session, the pleasure of building–a topic that architecture schools tend to ignore. He encourages students to see Nova‘s “The Great Cathedral Mystery” (David Murdock, 2014), for it’s inspiring story of Brunelleschi’s innovation in brickwork that made the domes of the Florence cathedral possible.


Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9523

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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value. To a question about whether new tools help or hinder this wonder, Moss argues it’s a question of seeing where the tools haven’t been. Kipnis suggests that new tools never quite solve the problem they were designed to address, but, rather, create a new mode of practice.


Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation Processes Systems Policy

January 10, 2014 |
Introduction by:

After a brief outline, Josef Fr?hlich discusses increasing complexity as a necessary and irreversible social trend, presenting evidence of how technological Research & Development is increasingly collaborative
and international. After presenting a variety of different definitions of complexity from different disciplines, Fr?hlich stresses the notion that the behavior of complex systems is not predictable. This has profound implications for every kind of planning activity, especially with regard to technological innovation. Instead of linear forecasting, Fr?hlich and his colleagues develop multiple, data-driven, narrative foresight scenarios. He discusses foresight techniques applied to long-range planning for the Austrian energy system, research coordination for the European Union, and the Austrian Science Center Network.

 

Clips

Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation Processes Systems Policy-clip_8435
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Wolf Prix introduces Josef Fr?hlich, of the Innovation Systems Department of the Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT) as a...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation Processes Systems Policy-clip_8436
Themes:
After a brief outline, Josef Fr?hlich discusses increasing complexity as a necessary and irreversible social trend. He discusses...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation Processes Systems Policy-clip_8437
Themes:
Josef Fr?hlich presents a variety of different definitions of complexity taken from different disciplines. He stresses...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation...
Josef Fr?hlich Complex Social Systems Innovation Processes Systems Policy-clip_8438
Josef Fr?hlich discusses some of the tools useful for guiding complex systems. He stresses social media, describing spatial...

Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay

October 17, 2008 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki’s translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He explains the manner in which he creates his own tools and seeks to be innovative, as well as maintain tradition. He discusses his innovative methods and the science of mixing compound metals. He describes his design inspiration, derived from nature and its constant changes. He then explains his philosophy in teaching. Nakagawa discusses the necessity of having clear focus and minimizing distractions in order to concentrate on the production of work.

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Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1204
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1204
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1213
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1213
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1220
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1220
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222
Nakagawa discusses the inspiration for his designs which are derived by nature. He states that his goal is to always challenge...

Paul Kennon Innovation in Architecture-clip_2233

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Kennon discusses the importance of education and curiosity in innovation. He states that architecture should be responsive to the basic psychological needs of the population. He emphasizes the importance of the paradigm shift of working within a team environment, stating the team should be intellectually and emotionally energetic. He refers to architecture as an extension of human activity and emphasizes the importance of the concept of indeterminacy within architecture to provide a spatial experience. He discusses technology as the means by which the intangible becomes tangible.