Video Archive | Jane Jacobs (5)

Ed Soja Putting Cities First-clip_3083
Eric Owen Moss introduces Soja’s lecture. Soja explains the title of the lecture as a reference to the fact that the majority...
The Next L. A. Doug Suisman Margaret Crawford Et...
The panelists discusses the role of design in public space. The argue that a resurgent street life that will provide alternatives...
Manuel De Landa Virtual Environments As Intuition...
Manuel De Landa answers question regarding history, computer science, and rational thought. During this session, De Landa...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1705
Charles Jencks moves onto contemporary British architecture by discussing the work of Cedric Price, Norman Foster, Ralph Erskine,...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1694
Charles Jencks introduces his lecture by describing his notorious Evolutionary Tree of Twentieth-Century Architecture...

Ed Soja Putting Cities First-clip_3083

View the Full Video: Ed Soja Putting Cities First
February 28, 2007 | Video Lecturer:

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Eric Owen Moss introduces Soja’s lecture. Soja explains the title of the lecture as a reference to the fact that the majority of people on Earth now live in cities. Soja quotes Jane Jacobs, “Without cities we would all be poor.” The second is Henri Lefebvre’s idea that all social life is influenced by cities. Soja points out that urbanism has influenced other disciplines, and that we should all be urbanists now.


The Next L. A. Doug Suisman Margaret Crawford Et Al-clip_4923

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The panelists discusses the role of design in public space. The argue that a resurgent street life that will provide alternatives to the shopping malls. Before the clip cuts out, they discuss the need to rediscover public life through small, vendor scaled attractions.


Manuel De Landa Virtual Environments As Intuition Synthesizers-clip_1219

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Manuel De Landa answers question regarding history, computer science, and rational thought. During this session, De Landa discusses evolution
in military tactics, the dynamics of Eastern and Wester civilizations, and his interest in rediscovering sensible intuition through analysis and virtual environments.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1705

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Charles Jencks moves onto contemporary British architecture by discussing the work of Cedric Price, Norman Foster, Ralph Erskine, and others. He describes Price’s Thinkbelt Project as one of Foster’s early influences, using Foster’s IBM Center and Black Piano to illustrate this further. Jencks also gives a briefe account of how, toward the mid-1970s, English architects begin to assemble and pull together many traditions of British architecture into collective cohesion, a theme that comes into much more prominence during the postmodern period.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1694

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Charles Jencks introduces his lecture by describing his notorious Evolutionary Tree of Twentieth-Century Architecture diagram. Jencks talks about the history of the Pop movement as a way of understanding this diagram. He shows other diagrams that characterize systems and proposes an idea of cyclical time versus reversible time.