Video Archive | Landscapes (67)

William Massie-clip_1547
William Massie discusses his ideas of subject/object relationships, technology, experimentation, and fabrication through a series...
William Massie
William Massie discusses his ideas of subject/object relationships, technology, experimentation, and fabrication through a series...
Thomas Daniell Of FOBA-clip_754
Daniell discusses the design of FOBA projects. He notes the difference between the cities of Tokyo and Kyoto, where Tokyo is a...
Thom Mayne-clip_4662
Mayne's early desire to build the houses Morphosis designed came from a desire to maintain control of the process and the work....
Peter Cook-clip_2248
Cook explains his seaside origins and the relationship between the population expansion and contraction he experienced during his...
Mathias Klotz
Mathias Klotz describes several projects in Chile from the past decade. The buildings are either rectangular boxes, or contain...
Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Klotz describes several small projects he has designed in Chile near Santiago: the Klotz house, the Ugarte house, the Muller...
Jinai Kim
Jinai Kim presents her architecture and urban design work in Korea. followed by a short Q&A with the audience. She discusses...

William Massie-clip_1547

View the Full Video: William Massie
November 12, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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William Massie discusses his ideas of subject/object relationships, technology, experimentation, and fabrication through a series of projects. Included in these projects is the Belt House, the Big Sky House, and a design for a house in which the shower is visible from every point in the house. Each project has a distinct relationship with the landscape; the first merges with the landscape, the second marks the landscape, and the third being alien to the landscape. Massie explains the rationale behind his studies in concrete forming, curved surfaces, and his unique use of PVC piping in creating surfaces.


William Massie

November 12, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

William Massie discusses his ideas of subject/object relationships, technology, experimentation, and fabrication through a series of projects. Included in these projects is the Belt House, the Big Sky House, and his winning MoMA P.S. 1 competition project for an urban beach. Massie explains the rationale behind his studies in concrete forming, curved surfaces, and his unique use of PVC piping in creating surfaces.

Clips

William Massie-clip_1535
William Massie-clip_1535
William Massie-clip_1547
William Massie-clip_1547
William Massie-clip_1555
William Massie-clip_1555
William Massie discusses his winning MOMA/PS1 competition project for an urban beach, which for Massie was about surface and...

Thomas Daniell Of FOBA-clip_754

View the Full Video: Thomas Daniell Of FOBA
October 3, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Daniell discusses the design of FOBA projects. He notes the difference between the cities of Tokyo and Kyoto, where Tokyo is a series of casually stacked boxes, and Kyoto is a gridded network of parks and gardens. Kyoto is known for its circulation paths and building mixed with landscape, and Daniell discusses that concept carried into their design concepts.


Thom Mayne-clip_4662

View the Full Video: Thom Mayne
November 13, 2002 |

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Mayne’s early desire to build the houses Morphosis designed came from a desire to maintain control of the process and the work. The early houses involved the integration of revered objects and their manufacturing process into the designs, along with other methods of subverting the conventional construction methodologies. The lanscape and interfacing site and building became more important, such that buildings became a form of site augmentation, as is evidenced in the Chiba Golf Club, Museo del Prado Competition, and Artspark Performing Arts Pavilion Competition.


Peter Cook-clip_2248

View the Full Video: Peter Cook
March 18, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

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Cook explains his seaside origins and the relationship between the population expansion and contraction he experienced during his youth and his interest in flexible programmatic models like Plug-in City. He elaborates on his interest in landscape as architecture and the intersection of hi-fi, smellies, growies, appliances, networks, and wiring in projects like the Veg House. Cook promotes enthusiasm as a method and atmosphere as an output as important as the position of or language of an architecture.


Mathias Klotz

February 17, 2000 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Mathias Klotz describes several projects in Chile from the past decade. The buildings are either rectangular boxes, or contain rectangular elements. The modernist houses are located on spectacular wilderness sites.

Clips

Mathias Klotz-clip_3764
Mathias Klotz-clip_3764
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Michael Speaks introduces Mathias Klotz, a young architect from Chile. While he has only been practicing for a decade Klotz...
Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Mathias Klotz-clip_3768
Mathias Klotz-clip_3768

Mathias Klotz-clip_3766

View the Full Video: Mathias Klotz
February 17, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Klotz describes several small projects he has designed in Chile near Santiago: the Klotz house, the Ugarte house, the Muller house, and the Reutter house. All the houses have a simple rectangular massing and a simple interior circulation. They also typically contain large balconies recessed into the massing to take in the spectacular sites. A lot of the houses appear to float on their site since they are elevated off the ground.


Jinai Kim

November 10, 1999 |
Introduction by:

Jinai Kim presents her architecture and urban design work in Korea. followed by a short Q&A with the audience. She discusses being inspired by flowers,
building interiors, and cityscapes. She believes, “architects and urban designers could be much humbler,” and “not make decisions for other people.” She describes her goal “to make some kind of interaction at the right time and at the right place,” and summarizes her four design principles as Create as little intervention as possible, Create as many options as possible for circulation and experience, Control and not-control and Nature as a metaphor.