Video Archive | Le Corbusier (75)

SciFI Symposium The City After The Economy-clip_3814
Participating by video, Amale Andraos and Dan Wood of the Manhattan firm Work AC describe their book, 49 Cities, which...
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2009
Charles Jencks talks about his last point in realizing the new shift in architecture, the enigmatic signifier. Jencks describes...
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238
Identifying the origin of modernist functionalism in Frederick Taylor, Vidler argues that modernism failed due to a lack of...
Vikramaditya Prakash
Vikramaditya Prakash discusses vernacular architectural practice in the developing world. He describes how the rapidly changing...
Jean-Marc Ibos, Myrto Vitart and Dominique Lyon-clip_5560
Greg Walsh introduces the next speaker, Dominique Lyon, recalling working with him at Gehry's office on a project for N?mes....
Charles Jencks Architecture Of The Jumping...
Charles Jencks, introduced by Michael Rotondi, reviews the history and influence of modernist ideals. Jencks presents an array of...
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4200
Reviewing the postcards and pictures that inspired Le Corbusier's Algerian women drawings, Colomina argues that there is a...
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027
Michael Rotondi introduces Beatriz Colomina, noting her most recent book Privacy and Publicity. Colomina begins by...

SciFI Symposium The City After The Economy-clip_3814

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Participating by video, Amale Andraos and Dan Wood of the Manhattan firm Work AC describe their book, 49 Cities, which examines a wide variety of built and hypothetical urban environments, mapping their ecological, economic, and industrial organization. In a brief history of urban housing, they reveal that Le Corbusier’s Radiant City seemed to consistently rank in the top of their subjective categories. They discuss the resurgence of urban farming and sustainablity as layering the environment and contemporary discourse.


Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2009

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Charles Jencks talks about his last point in realizing the new shift in architecture, the enigmatic signifier. Jencks describes Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao as moving architecture from monument to landmark. He also talks about the computer revolution which makes projects like Gehry’s possible through combining logistics, design, and production into a seamless structure.


Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238

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Identifying the origin of modernist functionalism in Frederick Taylor, Vidler argues that modernism failed due to a lack of adequate tools, not a flawed philosophy. He proposes that digital tools will fill in the void between the modernist dream of standardized housing, and the postmodern dream of completely personalized buildings. He cites works by Le Corbusier and Rem Koolhaas.


Vikramaditya Prakash

November 4, 1998 |
Introduction by:

Vikramaditya Prakash discusses vernacular architectural practice in the developing world. He describes how the rapidly changing landscape in South East Asian cities has renewed interest in master planning as a way to create “coherent visions for new mega-cities.” He discusses the ethical dilemma of master planning, and describes cases where Indian communities have resisted and adapted to master plans. He characterizes the local and global as “allegories of each other,” and calls master planning to be replaced by bodies and processes that produce and revise plans.


Charles Jencks Architecture Of The Jumping Universe-clip_2898

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Charles Jencks, introduced by Michael Rotondi, reviews the history and influence of modernist ideals. Jencks presents an array of projects and scientific discoveries to illustrate current discussions of postmodernist non-linearity, emergent properties, and complexity.


Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4200

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Reviewing the postcards and pictures that inspired Le Corbusier’s Algerian women drawings, Colomina argues that there is a photographic sensibility in Corbusier’s murals at E1027. During the questions after the lecture Colomina points out the bullet holes in E1027, describing how the German army used it during the occupation of France.


Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027

Michael Rotondi introduces Beatriz Colomina, noting her most recent book Privacy and Publicity. Colomina begins by explaining the title “Battle Lines E1027.” She cites Martin Heidegger on the concept of horizon, and Jos? Ortega y Gasset and Josep Lluis Sert the public being in the interior of the private. Colomina examines E1027, the house at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin designed by Eileen Gray as a vacation home for herself and Jean Badovici. After a discussion of Le Corbusier’s drawings of Algerian women, Colomina describes Corbusier’s obssesion with the E1027 house, the eight murals he painted inside it, the observatory he built near it, and his correspondence with Gray about it. Reviewing the postcards and pictures that inspired Le Corbusier’s Algerian women drawings, Colomina argues that there is a photographic sensibility in Corbusier’s murals at E1027. During the questions after the lecture Colomina points out the bullet holes in E1027, describing how the German army used it during the occupation of France.

Clips

Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4200
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4200
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4198
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4198
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4199
Beatriz Colomina Battle Lines E1027-clip_4199
Beaztriz Colomina examines E1027, the house at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin designed by Eileen Gray as a vacation home for herself and...