Video Archive | Le Corbusier (75)

Nigel Coates-clip_3336
Nigel Coates presents chairs from his Noah's Ark project that feature interlocking pieces. Invited to create an installation...
Mario Gandelsonas
Mario Gandelsonas discusses topics from his upcoming book, X-Urbanism: Architecture and the American City, which...
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9390
Mario Gandelsonas begins with an overview of the projects he will discuss. He mentions his upcoming book, X-Urbanism:...
Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3428
After an introduction by Michael Rotondi, Oubrerie discusses the importance of space, either natural or informed by desire. He...
Jos? Oubrerie
Jos? Oubrerie discusses a series of projects after an introduction by Michael Rotondi. Oubrerie's years of work with Le Corbusier...
Wes Jones-clip_931
Jones thinks that Le Corbusier took modernism in the wrong direction by choosing abstraction and mass production as the form of...
Lars Lerup-clip_5595
Robert Mangurian introduces Lars Lerup, commenting on Lerup's career progression in both architecture and academics. Lerup argues...
William Curtis-clip_5764
William Curtis briefly surveys ancient to contemporary architecture in India. He proposes a few enduring themes, such as concern...

Nigel Coates-clip_3336

View the Full Video: Nigel Coates
October 20, 1993 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Nigel Coates presents chairs from his Noah’s Ark project that feature interlocking pieces. Invited to create an installation inside an apartment of Le Corbusier’s Unit? d’Habitation in Firminy, Coates collaborated with Swart Helm to reconsider the idea of the family through the use of symbols representing a middle ground. A retail space for the fashion group Jigsaw in Knightsbridge, London exploits the idea of a square room without corners. In Hokkaido, Japan, Coates designed a hotel in an old bank building.


Mario Gandelsonas

April 1, 1992 |
Introduction by:

Mario Gandelsonas discusses topics from his upcoming book, X-Urbanism: Architecture and the American City, which approaches “the city as the architect’s desire,” or “the urban text as the object of desire.” He discusses Le Corbusier’s “love/hate” feelings for American cities and talks about the development of city grid. He also discusses the relevance of Marcel Duchamp. Gandelsonas shows drawings of city grids, which he calls “readings,” because he is both writing and reading them. He highlights drawings of Boston, New Haven, CT, and Chicago and details his “vision plan” for Des Moines, Iowa, distinguishing it from a master plan. He also shows photographs of a multi-building house he designed and calls it a “neurotic house,” for the way it creates, “relaxation and anxiety.” Speaking about city grids, he says, wherever there are breaks in the grid, there is “a point of entrance into the enigma of the city.”

Clips

Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9389
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9389
Themes:
Mike Davis calls his introduction of Mario Gandelsonas a “proper testimonial,” in the spirit of the testimonials offered in...
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9390
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9390
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9391
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9391
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9392
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9392
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9393
Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9393
Themes: ,
In a Q&A with the audience, Mario Gandelsonas explains that he works with elements of a city that “are never erased,”...

Mario Gandelsonas-clip_9390

View the Full Video: Mario Gandelsonas
April 1, 1992 |

Subclip

Mario Gandelsonas begins with an overview of the projects he will discuss. He mentions his upcoming book, X-Urbanism: Architecture and the American City, which discusses both Los Angeles and New York. He considers “the city as the architect’s desire,” and “the urban text as the object of desire.” He shows a slide of the design of Paris, which he characterizes as “the city as fabric,” and compares it to modern urban design. He talks about Le Corbusier’s “love/hate” feelings for American cities and talks about the development of city grid. He also brings up the relevance of Marcel Duchamp. Gandelsonas shows drawings of cities, including Manhattan, which he says, “do not correspond to Corbu’s” perceptions. He discusses Le Corbusier’s concept of “object as fabric and fabric as object.” When describing his enjoyment of drawing Los Angeles and its one-mile grid, Gandelsonas calls the freeways a “superficial perceptual sign of L.A.,” stating there is more to Los Angeles. He calls his drawings “readings,” because he is both writing and reading them.


Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3428

View the Full Video: Jos? Oubrerie
February 14, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

After an introduction by Michael Rotondi, Oubrerie discusses the importance of space, either natural or informed by desire. He discusses his Miller House as a project that creates several houselike objects within a larger house. This organization responded to the family’s desire for individual privacy as family members inhabited the space alone as much as they inhabited it collectively.


Jos? Oubrerie

February 14, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

Jos? Oubrerie discusses a series of projects after an introduction by Michael Rotondi. Oubrerie’s years of work with Le Corbusier frames his own work, and he discusses various project elements that operate in dialogue with his master. He also discusses his work as a spatial dialogue which emphasizes the relationships between the preexisting natural and built forms.

Clips

Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3428
Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3428
Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3431
Jos? Oubrerie-clip_3431

Wes Jones-clip_931

View the Full Video: Wes Jones
March 22, 1989 |

Subclip

Jones thinks that Le Corbusier took modernism in the wrong direction by choosing abstraction and mass production as the form of expression for architecture. He points out that architecture is still not mass-produced, and that abstraction has a tendency to alienate the individual. Jones also argues that technology has a formal language and logic which is a hybrid between nature and the human consciousness. He proposes technology can be mined for formal qualities, and be used to create more individualistic designs.


Lars Lerup-clip_5595

View the Full Video: Lars Lerup
November 2, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Robert Mangurian introduces Lars Lerup, commenting on Lerup’s career progression in both architecture and academics. Lerup argues that architecture is dead, and discusses the importance of the architectural promenade. He characterizes it in terms of the implied movement of form plus the actual movement of viewpoint. Lerup maintains that Le Corbusier realized the modernist dream of moving the subject up and through the building by opening the roof to the sky and the future.


William Curtis-clip_5764

View the Full Video: William Curtis
October 10, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

William Curtis briefly surveys ancient to contemporary architecture in India. He proposes a few enduring themes, such as concern for the climate, and relating forms to the human body. Curtis admits he is less interested
in monumental architecture than the vernacular buildings of rural villages and urban slums. He reviews the role of architecture in the transition from British rule to indepdendence, and discusses Le Corbusier and Chandigarh’s relationship to traditional Indian architecture.