Video Archive | Light construction (4)

Todd Gannon
Todd Gannon describes his interest in the phenomenon of obsession. He characterizes the unprecidented ability of contemporary...
Todd Gannon-clip_4652
Todd Gannon talks about his interest in form and surface problems and the idea of translating linguistic techniques to material...
Richard Warner-clip_5388
Richard Warner explains his work with plastic, fabric, and other low-cost materials as a response to working with clients with...
John Johansen-clip_5754
Johansen proposes several ideas that he believes represent the future of architecture. He believes that very lightweight...

Todd Gannon

October 9, 2009 |
Introduction by:

Todd Gannon describes his interest in the phenomenon of obsession. He characterizes the unprecidented ability of contemporary youth to multitask as a new kind of hyper-attention. He attributes this to advances in technology and especially real time feedback loops. He talks about his interest in form and surface problems and the idea of translating linguistic techniques to material form. He discusses his interest in a surface that organizes itself in terms of coded form and language. Gannon presents a few of his own projects, stressing the ability to come up with creative ways of working within economic constraints. He argues that media can create transparency in ways which is seldom explored.

Clips

Todd Gannon-clip_4651
Todd Gannon-clip_4651
Todd Gannon-clip_4652
Todd Gannon-clip_4652
Todd Gannon-clip_4654
Todd Gannon-clip_4654

Richard Warner-clip_5388

View the Full Video: Richard Warner
March 3, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Richard Warner explains his work with plastic, fabric, and other low-cost materials as a response to working with clients with limited budgets. Warner documents a series of completed projects, beginning with a children’s playhouse for an exhibition. He explains the use of lightweight, fabric construction. Warner presents a clothing store in Santa Monica and a house in Malibu. Warner concludes with his furniture and product design, citing the influence of Art Deco.


John Johansen-clip_5754

View the Full Video: John Johansen Duplicate
April 6, 1993 | Video Lecturer:

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Johansen proposes several ideas that he believes represent the future of architecture. He believes that very lightweight structures can be suspended from existing buildings, with computers regulating the tension of the cables. Also maglev technology will allow for efficient movement of people, or allow the program space to adapt. All these ideas point to architecture that is a lot lighter and less fixed than traditional architecture. Johansen sees that cyberspace is going develop significantly in the future, he still thinks humans will need physical space with physical properties to properly interact.