Video Archive | Marxism (6)

Patrik Schumacher Part One-clip_4032
Patrik Schumacher reviews his career, commenting on his initial interest in Marxism, and his exposure to modernism, high tech,...
The Next L. A. Concluding Discussion-clip_4676
John Kaliski discusses the social ideals of modernism and how those failed policies shape the current thought regarding urban...
Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese...
Charles Jencks describes developments in Italian architecture by citing several examples of items and projects that developed...
Charles Jencks Constructivism
Charles Jencks tracks the evolution of Russian constructivism as a way of bridging the gap between cubism, modernism, and the...
Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_869
Charles Jencks discusses the early twentieth century Russian history, concentrating on causes of the Russian revolutions. The...
Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_882
Charles Jencks answers questions about Russian constructivism. He describes both Marx, Lenin and related theories matured into...

Charles Jencks Recent Italian And Japanese Architecture-clip_2172

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Charles Jencks describes developments in Italian architecture by citing several examples of items and projects that developed through the 1960s and 1970s. He uses Carlo Maciachini’s Milan Cemetery to show how a collection of styles in one place can form a type of architectural utopia. Jencks frames the enduring metaphors and signifiers of 1930s Fascism as the context for subsequent explorations of irony and obscenity, especially in projects by Superstudio, and rationalists like Aldo Rossi.


Charles Jencks Constructivism

May 17, 1976 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Charles Jencks tracks the evolution of Russian constructivism as a way of bridging the gap between cubism, modernism, and the prevalent International Style. Jencks describes the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and how designers approached both. He cites Lenin and Marx on the role of government in
regulating style through the early half of the twentieth century. He breaks down the architectural evolution of the movement from before Tatlin’s Tower through its spread to other Communist countries like Poland and China, and finally, the eventual decline of the movement in favor of the International Style.

Clips

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Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_869
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Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_869

View the Full Video: Charles Jencks Constructivism
May 17, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

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Charles Jencks discusses the early twentieth century Russian history, concentrating on causes of the Russian revolutions. The revolutionary artists and designers captured this charged social atmosphere through publications and art. Jencks describes typical motifs of Russian constructivism including primary forms, colors, typography, and imagery. He uses these examples to build his argument that constructivism leads from early cubism to the architecture of Le Corbusier.


Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_882

View the Full Video: Charles Jencks Constructivism
May 17, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Charles Jencks answers questions about Russian constructivism. He describes both Marx, Lenin and related theories matured into Stalinism. Jencks defends his idea of history as “linear pluralities,” and how several movements are feeding and borrowing from constructivism and the culture of, then, contemporary Russia.