Video Archive | Memorials (8)

Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen and Eric Owen Moss discuss the historical, ethical and political issues behind Thomsen's proposal, with Eric...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen and Eric Owen Moss discuss some of the historical, ethical and political issues behind Thomsen's proposal, with...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen describes his personal experience of learning about the Holocaust, and Eric Owen Moss discusses its historical...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen describes the proposal for the site of Auschwitz, developed with Eric Kahn, as an attempt to temporarily "blank"...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2380
Saitowitz concludes his lecture with a presentation of a synagogue and ceremonial objects and his New England Holocaust...
Anthony Vidler
Anthony Vidler presents an argument tracing the trajectory of historicism and its contribution to the development of the concept...
Anthony Vidler-clip_1082
One year after the 1902 collapse of the Campanile in Venice historian Alois Riegl wrote The Modern Cult of Monuments...
Anthony Vidler-clip_1085
Anthony Vidler describes a cult-like fascination with monuments prevalent during the mid 18th century and gives works by Piranesi...

Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future Of Auschwitz

November 3, 2014 | Video Lecturer:

Russell Thomsen and Eric Owen Moss discuss the historical, ethical and political issues behind Thomsen’s proposal, with Eric Kahn, for Auschwitz. Thomsen characterizes it as temporarily “blanking” the site, making it inaccessible
and invisible. Moss raises the question of appropriate or inappropriate uses, citing Peter Eisenman’s Holocaust memorial in Berlin.

 

Clips

Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future Of Auschwitz-clip_9630
Russell Thomsen and Eric Owen Moss discuss some of the historical, ethical and political issues behind Thomsen's proposal, with...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future Of Auschwitz-clip_9631
Russell Thomsen describes his personal experience of learning about the Holocaust, and Eric Owen Moss discusses its historical...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future...
Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future Of Auschwitz-clip_9632
Russell Thomsen describes the proposal for the site of Auschwitz, developed with Eric Kahn, as an attempt to temporarily "blank"...

Russell Thomsen & Eric Owen Moss Thinking The Future Of Auschwitz-clip_9632

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Russell Thomsen describes the proposal for the site of Auschwitz, developed with Eric Kahn, as an attempt to temporarily “blank” the site, rendering it inaccessible and invisible. Eric Owen Moss raises the question of appropriate or inappropriate uses of the memorial, citing Peter Eisenman’s Holocaust memorial in Berlin.


Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2380

View the Full Video: Stanley Saitowitz
March 7, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

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Saitowitz concludes his lecture with a presentation of a synagogue and ceremonial objects and his New England Holocaust Memorial. Saitowitz reads a text which explains his intention to materialize a connection between the memorial and Boston’s Freedom Trail. He concludes describing the combination of memories and materials in the project.


Anthony Vidler

March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Anthony Vidler presents an argument tracing the trajectory of historicism and its contribution to the development of the concept of the historic monument. Introduced by Ron McCoy, he explains how Nietzsche’s idea of the past becoming the gravedigger of the present applies to such examples as the restoration of St. Mark’s Campanile in Venice, among others. Describing a sometimes cult-like obsession with objects of the past, Vidler shows how historicism developed through the 19th and 20th centuries. Concluding with a look at post-modern fascinations with the historic sublime, he notes how ridiculousness is often another side of the same coin.

Clips

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Anthony Vidler-clip_1082
Anthony Vidler-clip_1082
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Anthony Vidler-clip_1097

Anthony Vidler-clip_1082

View the Full Video: Anthony Vidler
March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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One year after the 1902 collapse of the Campanile in Venice historian Alois Riegl wrote The Modern Cult of Monuments which pointed out that originally all monuments were memorials. The idea of the historical monument developed in the 19th century, including a variety of artifacts that could become historical monuments simply by having existed in the past. Vidler explains four values that Riegl claimed to define the historical monument’s importance. Either historic value, artistic value, age value, or use value take the central role as they work against each other to give importance to monument or ruin.


Anthony Vidler-clip_1085

View the Full Video: Anthony Vidler
March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Anthony Vidler describes a cult-like fascination with monuments prevalent during the mid 18th century and gives works by Piranesi and Canaletto as examples of a preoccupation with ancient ruins. By the late 18th century interest shifts to the size of the ruins and buildings like the Column House by Fran?ois Racine de Monville appear. The 19th century witnessed the rise and fall of the monumental sublime as exemplified in renderings of Stonehenge by Turner. To save them from vandalism during the French Revolution, many of the country’s
antiquities were placed under the care of the artist Renoir who created elaborate settings for them in new museums.