Video Archive | Mexican art (6)

Enrique Norten
Eric Owen Moss introduces Enrique Norten. Moss suggests that there are four personalities to Enrique Norten while referencing...
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2180
Rub?n Ortiz Torres's presentation begins with a video showing various lowrider cars, eventually focusing on a truck with the...
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2181
SCI-Arc faculty member Gustavo LeClerc introduces Rub?n Ortiz-Torres and talks about his personal history. Born in Mexico City in...
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2182
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres discusses the making of his video Alien Toy followed by a selection of his work. The video features a...
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2183
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres explains that he has no bias against staging photos, but he finds that reality is often much stranger than...
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2185
Rub?n Ortiz-Torres discusses a selection of his work beginning with a series of airbrushed banners in the Mexican tradition of...

Enrique Norten

March 29, 2004 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Eric Owen Moss introduces Enrique Norten. Moss suggests that there are four personalities to Enrique Norten while referencing Cuauht?moc, Mexican painters David Alfaro Siqueiros and Frida Kahlo, and Mexican architect Luis Barrag?n. Norten discusses the contemporary cultural complexity within Mexico City. He reflects on contradictions between the vocabulary of a universal architectural discourse while also understanding and recognizing the specific particularities of his work. He emphasizes his strong belief in tectonics and architecture’s existence at the moment of construction and shows a combination of smaller and larger scale projects.


Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2180

View the Full Video: Rubén Ortiz-Torres
February 23, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Rub?n Ortiz Torres’s presentation begins with a video showing various lowrider cars, eventually focusing on a truck with the words “Alien Toy” painted on its doors. The truck’s bed lifts and splits, then begins to spin like helicopter blades over the truck. The camera then turns to the hood which also lifts and spins, followed by the doors which do the same. The front end of the truck then detaches and begins to drive around the back half while both continue dancing. This video is immediately followed by a live video performance using puppets, live DJ music, and a computerized voice reading a statement about the history of alien contributions to contemporary art.


Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2181

View the Full Video: Rubén Ortiz-Torres
February 23, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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SCI-Arc faculty member Gustavo LeClerc introduces Rub?n Ortiz-Torres and talks about his personal history. Born in Mexico City in 1964 to his famous folk musician parents, he is an artist who wanted to be a baseball player or an architect. He attended the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico and Cal Arts, moving to Los Angeles with a Fulbright Fellowship. His work has been exhibited at MOMA, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, El Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City, and the Museo Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Spain. He also received a recent commission to create a piece for the Getty Center in Los Angeles.


Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2182

View the Full Video: Rubén Ortiz-Torres
February 23, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Rub?n Ortiz-Torres discusses the making of his video Alien Toy followed by a selection of his work. The video features a lowrider truck designed and built by Salvador Mu?oz, originally called Wicked Death. Ortiz-Torres first met Mu?oz at a car show and was fascinated by his extreme take on a lowerider truck. He sees it as a mutation of a mutation. Ortiz-Torres discusses his photography in which he seeks to capture moments of clashing and mixing cultures. He sees this being provoked by outsiders in dislocated positions, such as Pablo Picasso working in France and Marcel Duchamp working in New York.


Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2183

View the Full Video: Rubén Ortiz-Torres
February 23, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Rub?n Ortiz-Torres explains that he has no bias against staging photos, but he finds that reality is often much stranger than anything he can fabricate. While a student at Cal Arts he befriended some of the people that worked in the cafeteria that led to a a series of portraits: two of the cafeteria workers and two of artist/instructors Michael Asher and John Baldessari that he commissioned from a street painter from Tijuana. Continuing his interest in appropriation, Ortiz-Torres produced a series of customized baseball hats with altered logos and slogans such as Malcom Mex and Rodney Kings. Not considering himself a muralist, he was surprised to find that he was expected to produce one when he attended a cultural festival in a Republican area of Belfast, Ireland.


Rub?n Ortiz-Torres-clip_2185

View the Full Video: Rubén Ortiz-Torres
February 23, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Rub?n Ortiz-Torres discusses a selection of his work beginning with a series of airbrushed banners in the Mexican tradition of airbrushed movie advertisements, but whose content focuses more on controversial current events. Discussing an anthropomorphic self portrait series using paintings and puppets, he also shows his original sketches for the Alien Toy truck where he imagines it as a mobile projection unit. His work with hybrids continues with a lowrider leaf blower project he created with gardener and inventor, Gody Sanchez who claimed that God gave him directions on how to alter a standard leaf blower to make it quieter and produce less pollution. After quickly discussing a series of minimalist paintings done with metallic car paint, he presents his upcoming commission for the Getty Center inspired by Che Guevara’s fingerprints taken at the time of his assassination in Bolivia. The piece features Che’s 1960 Chevy from Cuba, affixed with a custom hydraulics suspension so that it dances to a techno version of one of Ruben’s father’s songs entitled La Samba del Che, retitled La Samba del Chevy.