Video Archive | Modernism (104)

Gunnar Birkerts Objective Architecture-clip_5119
Gunnar Birkerts begins his lecture by describing his personal history in both art and architecture, attributing his sensibility...
Gunnar Birkerts Objective Architecture-clip_5123
Gunnar Birkerts responds to questions about his work, his beliefs, his office, and his background. He reinforces ideas mentioned...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman describes the first of his points, the "Loss of Center." He offers the idea that traditionally Man has a...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman uses his entry in a competition for a site neighboring Le Corbusier's proposed Venice Hospital to illustrate his...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt
Peter Eisenman grounds his work in the human condition by presenting four "Losses," then exploring the relation between each...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman describes his third point, the "Loss of Hero." Eisenman discusses how, during the industrial age, Enlightenment...
Zvi Hecker-clip_1306
Hecker explains his concept of "Polyhedric Architecture," as an attempt to explore spatial forms outside of the modernist cube....
A Quincy Jones-clip_5878
In this partially documented lecture architect A. Quincy Jones discusses the Herman Miller manufacturing plant in Michigan. ...

Gunnar Birkerts Objective Architecture-clip_5119

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Gunnar Birkerts begins his lecture by describing his personal history in both art and architecture, attributing his sensibility to “the modern masters.” Birkerts combines the personal, the theoretical and the scientific to outline his major criteria. He argues that architecture can be purely objective, and that its main purpose is to promote a direction or position.


Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_944

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Peter Eisenman describes the first of his points, the “Loss of Center.” He offers the idea that traditionally Man has a hierarchical belief system with either God, Man, or Nature as the center of the system. As technology became the center, Man developed a keen obsession to machines and industrialization culminating into the two great tragedies of modern civilization, the Holocaust and Hiroshima. These two events, revealed to the world over a relatively short time, resulted in Man ejecting technology from the center. With no replacement, Man now exists without a center for any belief system.


Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_951

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Peter Eisenman uses his entry in a competition for a site neighboring Le Corbusier’s proposed Venice Hospital to illustrate his four points. While doing so he describes two standard approaches to site planning, then divulges his own view, a new third type that practices muteness. He talks about the competition concept and his planning exercises during the initial phases of design. When summing up the project, Eisenman reestablishes his ideas and how they deal with architecture and society. This is the end of part one of a two part lecture.


Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt

April 3, 1978 | Video Lecturer:

Peter Eisenman grounds his work in the human condition by presenting four “Losses,” then exploring the relation between each “Loss” and his hypothesis of “Social Guilt.” Through a mix of theory, history, and humor Eisenman explains how and why his views engage society and architecture. He summarizes the four points into a limited competition for a site neighboring Le Corbusier’s proposed Venice Hospital. While explaining the competition, Eisenman describes a new view of site planning that explores “mute” expression, giving a new “Five Points of Architecture.” It’s unclear whether the end of the video is the actual end of the lecture.

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Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_944
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_946
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_951
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_948
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_950
Peter Eisenman describes his fourth point: the "Loss of History." He discusses the human ability to detach History from Memory....

Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_948

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Peter Eisenman describes his third point, the “Loss of Hero.” Eisenman discusses how, during the industrial age, Enlightenment ideas of the hero shifted from the individual to the collective. The idea of the collective hero clashed so harshly with the realities of the Holocaust and Hiroshima that society immediately switched to a idea of collective survival. Heros of the Holocaust, he argues, were heros of survival, thus giving a face to the paranoia of the nuclear age. Eisenman states that because society replaced the Hero with the concept of survival, it calls into question the value and iconography in every cultural institution, from kindergarden to graveyards.


Zvi Hecker-clip_1306

View the Full Video: Zvi Hecker
November 2, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

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Hecker explains his concept of “Polyhedric Architecture,” as an attempt to explore spatial forms outside of the modernist cube. He proposes that architecture can be understood as units that come together under certain pressures: social pressures are one example of this. Space packing observed in bubbles, and the stacking of wares in an Indian market are also cited as influences for his work. Here he finds an opportunity for the reproduction of symbolic forms with a synagogue project where the geometries are representative of Jewish visual traditions.