Video Archive | Modernism (104)

Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287
Stanley Saitowitz argues that modernism offers two paths: “form and meaning,” and “space and experience.” He places Frank...
Sam Jacob-clip_3524
Sam Jacob presents a series of projects that engage with a sense of place. Jacob discusses an exhibition in Ljubljana, which...
Sam Jacob
Michael Speaks introduces Sam Jacob, and the work of his firm Fat (Fashion Architecture Taste). Jacob discusses his office as a...
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob
Anthony Vidler discusses digital technologies and the contribution they are poised to make in postmodern residential design....
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3236
Craig Hodgetts introduces Anthony Vidler as a leader in adapting architectural discourse to the changing technological landscape.
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238
Identifying the origin of modernist functionalism in Frederick Taylor, Vidler argues that modernism failed due to a lack of...
Mathias Klotz
Mathias Klotz describes several projects in Chile from the past decade. The buildings are either rectangular boxes, or contain...
Mathias Klotz-clip_3764
Michael Speaks introduces Mathias Klotz, a young architect from Chile. While he has only been practicing for a decade Klotz...

Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287

View the Full Video: Stanley Saitowitz
September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Saitowitz argues that modernism offers two paths: “form and meaning,” and “space and experience.” He places Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and others in the former category and Robert Venturi in the latter. Saitowitz says he considers this discourse part of his work. He shows photographs of his work and explains the first set of projects have to do with “time and space.” Saitowitz states he is “more interested in space than in meaning,” and the “invisible.” He talks about other projects as systems, and “instrumentality,” and others as “materiality.” He shows photographs of recent work, mostly in northern California. Houses with what he calls “linear configurations.” These “bar houses” as he suggests, are “Usonian houses for the rich.”


Sam Jacob-clip_3524

View the Full Video: Sam Jacob
September 5, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

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Sam Jacob presents a series of projects that engage with a sense of place. Jacob discusses an exhibition in Ljubljana, which combines images of different geographies around the globe to communicate a sense of global flows of information. He proposes a new consideration of modernism, arguing that it was defined by radio communication, not industrialization. Jacob presents a proposal for a pedestrian bridge, and a relocation of an existing park to a new geographic location.


Sam Jacob

September 5, 2002 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Michael Speaks introduces Sam Jacob, and the work of his firm Fat (Fashion Architecture Taste). Jacob discusses his office as a vehicle for exploring the limits of the discipline. He argues for looking outside of the field of architecture to engage with a wider array of cultures. He cites the work of media commentator Marshall McLuhan. The first series of projects presented by Jacob treat architecture as media, or pure message. The second series observe the lingering effects of modernization.

Clips

Sam Jacob-clip_3522
Sam Jacob-clip_3522
SCI-Arc graduate program coordinator Michael Speaks presents an introduction to Sam Jacob's work with his firm Fat (Fashion...
Sam Jacob-clip_3523
Sam Jacob-clip_3523
Sam Jacob discusses exploring the limits of the discipline of architecture with his office, Fat. He argues for looking outside of...
Sam Jacob-clip_3524
Sam Jacob-clip_3524

Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob

February 28, 2001 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Anthony Vidler discusses digital technologies and the contribution they are poised to make in postmodern residential design. Vidler argues that digital tools will disrupt existing design methodologies far beyond changing architectural representation. He focuses on housing because he it contains both a high degree of standardization, and a high degree of personalization. Vidler references works by Le Corbusier, Rem Koolhaas, and Diller and Scofidio.

Clips

Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3236
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3236
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3237
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3237
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3249
Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3249

Anthony Vidler Between The Box And The Blob-clip_3238

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Identifying the origin of modernist functionalism in Frederick Taylor, Vidler argues that modernism failed due to a lack of adequate tools, not a flawed philosophy. He proposes that digital tools will fill in the void between the modernist dream of standardized housing, and the postmodern dream of completely personalized buildings. He cites works by Le Corbusier and Rem Koolhaas.


Mathias Klotz

February 17, 2000 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Mathias Klotz describes several projects in Chile from the past decade. The buildings are either rectangular boxes, or contain rectangular elements. The modernist houses are located on spectacular wilderness sites.

Clips

Mathias Klotz-clip_3764
Mathias Klotz-clip_3764
Themes: ,
Michael Speaks introduces Mathias Klotz, a young architect from Chile. While he has only been practicing for a decade Klotz...
Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Mathias Klotz-clip_3768
Mathias Klotz-clip_3768