Video Archive | Modernism (104)

Mathias Klotz-clip_3766
Klotz describes several small projects he has designed in Chile near Santiago: the Klotz house, the Ugarte house, the Muller...
Mathias Klotz-clip_3768
Klotz describes a several larger projects his firm has designed in Chile. For the Colegio Altamira in Santiago, Klotz devised...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6103
Neil Denari introduces Christian de Portzamparc as an heir of modernism, who has dealt with modernism's demise and aftermath with...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6106
Portzamparc describes some early urban design projects, a huge hotel for Disney, and an earlier water tower redesign for...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One
Portzamparc describes in detail his design for the Luxembourg Philharmonic, a proposed concert hall for Nara, Japan, and the Cit?...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6108
Portzamparc describes his transformation of several modernist residential towers. He attempts to connect the towers to the...
Michael Sorkin-clip_1323
Michael Sorkin describes a fake cafe near the congested Canal Street in New York, constructed in two weeks as a movie set. This...
Bruno Queysanne Part One
Bruno Queysanne presents some of his research concerning the conflict between the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the...

Mathias Klotz-clip_3766

View the Full Video: Mathias Klotz
February 17, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Klotz describes several small projects he has designed in Chile near Santiago: the Klotz house, the Ugarte house, the Muller house, and the Reutter house. All the houses have a simple rectangular massing and a simple interior circulation. They also typically contain large balconies recessed into the massing to take in the spectacular sites. A lot of the houses appear to float on their site since they are elevated off the ground.


Mathias Klotz-clip_3768

View the Full Video: Mathias Klotz
February 17, 2000 | Video Lecturer:

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Klotz describes a several larger projects his firm has designed in Chile. For the Colegio Altamira in Santiago, Klotz devised four long rectangular buildings with a central yard, gymnasium, and auditorium. A hotel connects the massing to the landscape with a long terrace, like one of his residential projects. He also describes a building for processing and storing wine, and some bus stop designs.


Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6106

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Portzamparc describes some early urban design projects, a huge hotel for Disney, and
an earlier water tower redesign for Marne-la-Vall?e which was built and provided a central focus for the city. He discusses the nature of urban design at the end of the modernism, when the traffic engineers were left in charge. Portzamparc’s strategy is to design buildings, like the Les Hautes Formes social housing project, which shape not only the built space, but the void surrounding the buildings.


Christian De Portzamparc Part One

December 9, 1998 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Portzamparc describes in detail his design for the Luxembourg Philharmonic, a proposed concert hall for Nara, Japan, and the Cit? de la Musique complex in Paris. He then delves into his early career to demonstrate how he has dealt with the issue of placemaking. He then discusses his views on urbanism, building massing, sightlines, and how they relate to modernism’s and classicism’s conception of the city. Portzamparc then presents several examples of his views put in action including the Quartier Massena. He finishes with a couple of buildings that are quite distinctive examples of public space, including the extension of the Paris Convention Center and the Espace des Sciences in Rennes.

Clips

Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6109
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6109
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6104
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6104
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6105
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6105
Portzamparc describes his project for the Cit? de la Musique near Paris. It consists of a large music and performing arts school,...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6106
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6106
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6107
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6107
Where modernists ignore void space when designing cities, Portzamparc advocates returning to classical notions of urban design,...

Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6108

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Portzamparc describes his transformation of several modernist residential towers. He attempts to connect the towers to the street, retrofit the buildings so that they are more suitable for contemporary inhabitants, and create a focused public space. Portzamparc proposes the “open block” concept for urban design: building blocks organized around multiuse circulation corridors, i.e. streets. In order to allow light to penetrate deeper, add variety of building types, and avoid urban canyons, his plan does not allow the full perimeter of the block to be built. This would allow a variety of architects to build buildings conforming with this plan, as was done in the Massena neighborhood in Paris.


Michael Sorkin-clip_1323

View the Full Video: Michael Sorkin
February 14, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Michael Sorkin describes a fake cafe near the congested Canal Street in New York, constructed in two weeks as a movie set. This is an example of how the authentic city which is accessible and malleable, is becoming a mendacity with slipped-in meaning. Walter Hudson, in addition to being the world’s fattest man, is the paradigmatic citizen of the simulated city of post-electronic paranoia. Full participation in the electronic city requires a remarkable relinquishing of privacy as the body becomes public space, and putting democracy in doubt by inhibiting the ability to freely associate. As electronic space collapses difference, new models of democratic relation must emerge from the modernist sameness.


Bruno Queysanne Part One

February 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Bruno Queysanne presents some of his research concerning the conflict between the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the architect Adolf Loos. He discusses the view that anything added to a building that is not part of its structure diminishes it as a work of architecture. He argues that Wittgenstein’s house for his sister doesn’t reflect Wittgenstein’s work in philosophy. Queysanne characterizes the house’s lack of cladding outside, and the abundant cladding inside seems to suggest agreement with Loos’ and Gottfried Semper’s argument that cladding is the true origin of architecture instead of the structure. Queysanne compares Wittgenstein’s plan for his sister’s house with the plan created earlier by the architect Paul Engleman. Wittgenstein was so committed to avoiding any kind of ornamentation that he excluded necessary structural elements in order to maintain a pure form. Turning to Loos, Queysanne argues that Loos strove to charge a space with feeling so that the structure would recede to the background. The Villa Muller’s exterior is similar to the Wittgenstein house in its minimal exterior, but achieves meaning absent in the Wittgenstein house through the protective metal at the top the walls, a type of cornice. He discusses some provocative details of the interior of Loos’ Villa Muller: textile used as marble, furniture that is part of the structure, openings that connect spaces.

Clips

Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5736
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5736
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5729
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5729
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5730
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5730
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5731
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5731
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5732
Bruno Queysanne Part One-clip_5732