Video Archive | Monuments (7)

Amy Landesberg And Lisa Quatrale Of Liquid Inc-clip_2226
Landesberg and Quatrale discuss monument projects within the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The monuments "The Other Woman,"...
Anthony Vidler
Anthony Vidler presents an argument tracing the trajectory of historicism and its contribution to the development of the concept...
Anthony Vidler-clip_1082
One year after the 1902 collapse of the Campanile in Venice historian Alois Riegl wrote The Modern Cult of Monuments...
Anthony Vidler-clip_1085
Anthony Vidler describes a cult-like fascination with monuments prevalent during the mid 18th century and gives works by Piranesi...
Anthony Vidler-clip_1097
Anthony Vidler discusses examples of the contradictions that arise from tampering with historical objects in efforts to...
Raimund Abraham-clip_1018
Raimund Abraham uses several different houses he worked on to investigate the typology of the single family dwelling. His...
Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_871
Charles Jencks emphasizes the role of women in the early constructivist movement, and the theatrical quality of the revolution....

Amy Landesberg And Lisa Quatrale Of Liquid Inc-clip_2226

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Landesberg and Quatrale discuss monument projects within the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The monuments “The Other Woman,” “Unblind,” and “Taking Names” represent notions of movement, orientation, and utilize the video as media which provide orientation and navigational services. These also provide information, public service announcements and video art and consequently provide the viewer with the image of the city, describing a dual public realm. The monument, “Taking Names” pays homage to those victims of AIDS, through the provision of a computer which allows users to enter names of victims into a database.


Anthony Vidler

March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Anthony Vidler presents an argument tracing the trajectory of historicism and its contribution to the development of the concept of the historic monument. Introduced by Ron McCoy, he explains how Nietzsche’s idea of the past becoming the gravedigger of the present applies to such examples as the restoration of St. Mark’s Campanile in Venice, among others. Describing a sometimes cult-like obsession with objects of the past, Vidler shows how historicism developed through the 19th and 20th centuries. Concluding with a look at post-modern fascinations with the historic sublime, he notes how ridiculousness is often another side of the same coin.

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Anthony Vidler-clip_1082

View the Full Video: Anthony Vidler
March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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One year after the 1902 collapse of the Campanile in Venice historian Alois Riegl wrote The Modern Cult of Monuments which pointed out that originally all monuments were memorials. The idea of the historical monument developed in the 19th century, including a variety of artifacts that could become historical monuments simply by having existed in the past. Vidler explains four values that Riegl claimed to define the historical monument’s importance. Either historic value, artistic value, age value, or use value take the central role as they work against each other to give importance to monument or ruin.


Anthony Vidler-clip_1085

View the Full Video: Anthony Vidler
March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Anthony Vidler describes a cult-like fascination with monuments prevalent during the mid 18th century and gives works by Piranesi and Canaletto as examples of a preoccupation with ancient ruins. By the late 18th century interest shifts to the size of the ruins and buildings like the Column House by Fran?ois Racine de Monville appear. The 19th century witnessed the rise and fall of the monumental sublime as exemplified in renderings of Stonehenge by Turner. To save them from vandalism during the French Revolution, many of the country’s
antiquities were placed under the care of the artist Renoir who created elaborate settings for them in new museums.


Anthony Vidler-clip_1097

View the Full Video: Anthony Vidler
March 4, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Anthony Vidler discusses examples of the contradictions that arise from tampering with historical objects in efforts to monumentalize western civilization. Examples of this are found in Schinkel’s Altes Museum and his farmhouse project as well as various efforts to restore Roman and Greek antiquities. Viollet le Duc did various restorations of medieval structures in the 19th century without the aim of maintaining, repairing, nor rebuilding them. Instead he believed the purpose of a restoration was to re-establish in a complete state what never existed.


Raimund Abraham-clip_1018

View the Full Video: Raimund Abraham
November 3, 1982 | Video Lecturer:

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Raimund Abraham uses several different houses he worked on to investigate the typology of the single family dwelling. His work questions the house/object, user/receiver relationships by re-imagining how we inhabit spaces and associate memories to homes. Abraham describes his work as rational geometric investigations colliding with ethereal affects. Abraham illustrates this further in two projects he did for the 1976 Venice Biennale and the Berlin Congress Hall.


Charles Jencks Constructivism-clip_871

View the Full Video: Charles Jencks Constructivism
May 17, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

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Charles Jencks emphasizes the role of women in the early constructivist movement, and the theatrical quality of the revolution. He introduces Tatlin’s Tower as a pivotal work of constructivism and how this propel’s the movement into alignment with the politics, intentions, and propaganda of the post-revolutionary Soviet Union. Jencks shows subsequent architectural developments and work in other media, such as, photography, theatre, film and engineering as a way of explaining the evolution of the ideas and themes behind the movement.