Video Archive | Movie theaters (5)

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a...
Steven Holl Compression-clip_3020
Steven Holl describes several competitions, including Venice's Palazzo del Cinema and MIT student dormitories, as attempts to...
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5547
Craig Hodgetts and Ming Fung discuss a project that tries to capture the spectacle of Hollywood cinematically, while also...
Mehrdad Yazdani
Mehrdad Yazdani, a former design principle and a vice-president with Ellerbe Becket, describes the work of his firm. He prefaces...
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9386
Mehrdad Yazdani highlights the design of a house for himself and his wife, a fashion designer. He explains how he wanted to...

Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877

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Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a perfect solution. He explains his back and forth, analog and digital methodology. He argues that imperfections and chance occurrences can generate emotional content. He discusses client relationships in terms of the balance of what they want and what he hopes to achieve. He stresses the importance of fighting for projects, arguing that radical architecture is not just in the idea itself but in the building.


Steven Holl Compression-clip_3020

View the Full Video: Steven Holl Compression
September 11, 2003 | Video Lecturer:

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Steven Holl describes several competitions, including Venice’s Palazzo del Cinema and MIT student dormitories, as attempts to compress time and scale through architectural devices. Holl describes how irreducible objects might influence concept and form simultaneously. He describes how he strives for scaleless forms and anti-contextual architecture through programmatic integration.


Mehrdad Yazdani

March 9, 1994 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Mehrdad Yazdani, a former design principle and a vice-president with Ellerbe Becket, describes the work of his firm. He prefaces his talk by saying that when he was in school in the 1980s, there were new definitions of “isms” coming out weekly, however he is more interested in constructed architecture. He discusses his design for a Red Line Metro Station in Los Angeles, the site and its relation to topography and surface, and his intention to create an urban space. Yazdani also shows two projects for the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power, and the design of a house for himself and his wife, a fashion designer reflecting her forms and patterns. He discusses various corporate projects from Ellerbe Becket during the 1980s. Yazdani presents current projects such as clubhouse in Oman and a movie theatre at the Universal City – City Walk.

Clips

Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9382
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9382
Aaron Betsky introduces Mehrdad Yazdani and states Yazdani will teach a Studio in Professional Development Program at SCI-Arc in...
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9384
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9384
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9385
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9385
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9386
Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9386

Mehrdad Yazdani-clip_9386

View the Full Video: Mehrdad Yazdani
March 9, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

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Mehrdad Yazdani highlights the design of a house for himself and his wife, a fashion designer. He explains how he wanted to address architecture and fashion. He made collages of the architectural design, incorporating patterns his wife was designing for the body. The Yazdanis’ also designed furniture for the house the same way. He discusses the design of a hillside residence, which he describes as “two sliding vertical masses…on a portion of the site.” The house has a glass foyer, with the master bedroom on the second floor. Yazdani shows various corporate projects from Ellerbe Becket during the 1980s. For a large corporate building in Dallas, he mentions using blue glass, stainless steel and clear glass. For a tower project he talks about using stainless steel with silver-tinted glass on the exterior. Yazdani gives examples of buildings he calls “the autonomous object,” including a 300-bed hospital in Seoul, Korea with what he calls a “sky garden,” a way “to see through the building to the sky.” He also describes a prototype for an “interactive entertainment building,” with an “electronic town square.”