Video Archive | Mystery (7)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Tom Wiscombe-clip_9652
Jeffrey Kipnis discusses Tom Wiscombe's work, beginning with projects for Coop Himmelb(l)au (the Open House, the Busan Cinema...
Coy Howard Exhibition Discussion-clip_3825
Coy Howard answers questions from Eric Owen Moss about his installation in the SCI-Arc gallery. Moss begins referencing the...
Lawrence Weschler-clip_2583
Author Lawrence Weschler discusses his new book, Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder, which explores The Museum of Jurassic...
Lawrence Weschler-clip_2585
Weschler continues his discussion of David Wilson's Museum of Jurassic Technology.
Lawrence Weschler-clip_2586
Weschler concludes his discussion of David Wilson's Museum of Jurassic Technology.
Raimund Abraham-clip_1881
Michael Rotondi introduces Thom Mayne who in turn introduces Raimund Abraham. In a pluralistic world of chaos, intimacy is a...
Peter Cook And Christine Hawley-clip_6021
Peter Cook argues that it is reasonable not only for architecture to be very weird, but the thinking behind it. He sees...

Coy Howard Exhibition Discussion-clip_3825

View the Full Video: Coy Howard Exhibition Discussion
November 19, 2010 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Coy Howard answers questions from Eric Owen Moss about his installation in the SCI-Arc gallery. Moss begins referencing the riddle of the sphinx and the Gordian knot, suggesting that Howard’s work may be too didactic in that it represents only one person’s views. Howard explains that his work is about experience and that the graphics, writing, and objects in the work provide a multi-sensory input that allows for processing in many different ways. Admitting that it does represent his point of view that mystery is the ground of experience. He claims that the role of his work is to arouse a sense of curiosity and mystery.


Raimund Abraham-clip_1881

View the Full Video: Raimund Abraham
March 6, 1991 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Michael Rotondi introduces Thom Mayne who in turn introduces Raimund Abraham. In a pluralistic world of chaos, intimacy is a refuge and method for studying human existence. Abraham talks about his own work in terms of memory and tactility, and imparts his projects with a moving sense of power and single-mindedness. He seeks mysteries in a world that needs mysteries more than solutions.


Peter Cook And Christine Hawley-clip_6021

Subclip

Peter Cook argues that it is reasonable not only for architecture to be very weird, but the thinking behind it. He sees architecture as being comprised of the obvious and the mysterious, using Stonehenge as an example. He claims that the affinity for invention and silliness is thoroughly British and can be found throughout British engineering and thinking. He also warns of a British tendency to retreat behind an understated architecture, as compared to the tendency towards the outrageous in contemporary Japanese architecture.