Video Archive | Office buildings (23)

Bernard Tschumi Concept & Notation-clip_9639
Under the theme "Space and event," Bernard Tschumi discusses his early publications Advertisements for Architecture...
Stefano Passeri Design Of Theory Fellowship Lecture
Stefano Passeri with Ben Farnsworth was a Design of Theory Fellow at SCI-Arc for the program's inaugural year 2013-4. Passeri...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and...
Ramiro Diaz Granados Cartoonishly Visceral-clip_7575
Diaz-Granados discusses several projects that have come out of his interest in electric fields, including an office building for...
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions
David Bergman proposes thinking about cities in terms of five parameters: the generic point, area "as signifier of culture,"...
Michael Maltzan-clip_1332
Maltzan concludes with two projects which, in addition to strong urban engagement, address social interaction and environmental...
Henry Cobb-clip_4902
Henry Cobb describes a series of early towers, and then focuses on Boston's John Hancock Building. Cobb talks about the existing...
Jesse Reiser-clip_4848
Jesse Reiser discusses a proposal for a children's museum in Pittsburgh, stressing the existing site conditions exploited in his...

Bernard Tschumi Concept & Notation-clip_9639

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Under the theme “Space and event,” Bernard Tschumi discusses his early publications Advertisements for Architecture (1977) and The Manhattan Transcripts (1981), and the early follies that led to the project for La Vilette (1982-98). He discusses his projects for the Tokyo Opera House (1986) and Kansai Airport (1988) and Le Fresnoy Art Center (1997) in terms of “Program and Juxtaposition.” Tschumi describes the advent of digital design in conjunction with the theme “Vectors and envelopes,” including projects such as the Rouen Concert Hall (2001) and the Vacheron Constantin Headquarters (2005).


Stefano Passeri Design Of Theory Fellowship Lecture

October 3, 2014 |
Introduction by:

Stefano Passeri with Ben Farnsworth was a Design of Theory Fellow at SCI-Arc for the program’s inaugural year 2013-4. Passeri discusses their re-launch of SCI-Arc’s journal Offramp, and analyzes his 2013 thesis project, stressing strategies employed to create an inwardly-focused, enclosed and finite object.

 

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Stefano Passeri Design Of Theory Fellowship...
Stefano Passeri Design Of Theory Fellowship Lecture-clip_9552
Dora Epstein-Jones introduces Stefano Passeri, who, with Ben Farnsworth, were the 2013-4 Design of Theory Fellows at SCI-Arc....

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9522

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Eric Owen Moss discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building in terms of the relationship between design and realization. He alternately discusses his buildings in terms of analogies of architectural history, with Travida representing the medieval; Stealth, the renaissance; Waffle, the baroque; and Pterodactyl, the modern.


David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions

April 1, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

David Bergman proposes thinking about cities in terms of five parameters: the generic point, area “as signifier of culture,” volume as “the power of the state exercised on a building,” time as “a pathway for development,” and capitalism as “a technology for development.” He discusses the contemporary city as a construction of economic policies and zoning regulations designed to increase capital investments. He discusses the urban mapping achieved by Nolli’s map of Rome. Bergman talks about the parameter of time as a pathway for urban development. When speaking about the parameter of volume, Bergman stresses how floor area ratios and zoning envelopes are manipulated by capital
and commerce. He contrasts urban growth over time in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Butte, and Detroit. Bergman describes capital as the fifth dimension of urban development, and the force that creates cities and spurs economic growth. Bergman argues that all architectural proposals are economically evaluated accoding to four measures: net operating rate, capitalization rate, rate of return, and total rate of return.

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David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4958
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4958
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4959
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4959
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960
David Bergman Planning In Five Dimensions-clip_4960

Michael Maltzan-clip_1332

View the Full Video: Michael Maltzan
September 27, 2006 |

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Maltzan concludes with two projects which, in addition to strong urban engagement, address social interaction and environmental intent through negotiations of structure and geometry. For an Art and Science Museum in Fresno, CA Maltzan creates a social overlap with the city by floating the building to generate a shaded public plaza and exposing the building’s underbelly while establishing seamed openings both through and into the building. Lastly, for Pirelli in Milan, he creates a mid-height bridged connection between two office buildings, both allowing for flexibility in use and tenancy within the two structures and generating new social connections through the use of an open bat-wing truss.