Video Archive | Postmodernism (43)

Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064
Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that...
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067
Stanley Tigerman's urban villa project for the Berlin IBA takes Mies Van Der Rohe's 1909 Perls House as a model for his...
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4069
Stanley Tigerman's Energy Museum in Zion, Illinois takes into consideration the history of a town designed by an Evangelical...
Stanley Tigerman
Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that...
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4070
Stanley Tigerman's project for the 2000 exhibition at the Staatsgalerie in Berlin comments on the present condition and possible...
Text and Textures of Urban Memory Part One-clip_9268
Michael Rotondi offers a context for the lecture as architectural discourse. Aaron Betsky introduces the four panelists in the...
Fritz Neumeyer-clip_5935
Fritz Neumeyer reviews some of Mies' work, including his 1923 concrete office building. Neumeyer rejects the traditional view...
Fritz Neumeyer
Fritz Neumeyer interprets Ludwig Mies van der Rohe as more varied and relevant to contemporary discourse than usually presented....

Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that his work is in the central tradition of architecture in that it produces objects that synthesize disparate conditions. When discussing deconstructivism as an alternate approach, he says it is ethical because it reflects the issues of the day, but it does not try to build on or add anything new to work from the past. A house he designed with his partner and wife Margaret McCurry came from an interest in the language of rural America’s hybridized architecture.


Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Tigerman’s urban villa project for the Berlin IBA takes Mies Van Der Rohe’s 1909 Perls House as a model for his tripartite design. He did not want to simply do a contextual design because it infers a disillusionment with one’s own time. Instead, he took what looks like an ordinary house and split it in two, gridding and measuring the resulting gap with the cubit as a basic unit. Tigerman’s synagogue project which was not built looks back to the state of Judaism before and after Christ, and attempts to fuse the two.


Stanley Tigerman-clip_4069

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Tigerman’s Energy Museum in Zion, Illinois takes into consideration the history of a town designed by an Evangelical minister, and attempts to rewrite the town’s connection to Jerusalem. Tigerman wanted to do a building that would represent an attempt to heal an irreparable wound with an optimism that separates architects from readers. Architects try to rewrite something knowing that they will fail, and with the awareness that nostalgia is not resolvable, exile is perpetual, and death cannot be overcome.


Stanley Tigerman

March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that his architecture is in the central tradition of architecture in that it produces objects that synthesize disparate conditions. His urban villa project for the Berlin IBA takes Mies Van Der Rohe’s 1909 Perls House as a model for his tripartite design. His Energy Museum in Zion, Illinois considers that the town was designed by an Evangelical minister, and attempts to rewrite the town’s connection to Jerusalem. His project for the 2000 exhibition at the Staatsgalerie in Berlin attempts a kind of rewriting that comments on the condition and potential of the city. A hum throughout the video gets louder near the end.

Clips

Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4069
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4069
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4070
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4070

Stanley Tigerman-clip_4070

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Stanley Tigerman’s project for the 2000 exhibition at the Staatsgalerie in Berlin comments on the present condition and possible future of the city. The project breaks the Berlin Wall at a series of points that result in passages that let people freely pass over and under the wall, and creates a linear park along both sides. Tigerman responds to questions from the audience, stating that it’s impossible to remember who
one is and what one has done, and that honest reflections of the current state of things are ethical considerations.


Text and Textures of Urban Memory Part One-clip_9268

View the Full Video:
March 18, 1988 |

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Michael Rotondi offers a context for the lecture as architectural discourse. Aaron Betsky introduces the four panelists in the lecture: Ann Bergren, Professor of Classics at UCLA and SCI-Arc instructor; Anthony Vidler, Professor of Architecture at Princeton; Kurt Forster, Director of the Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities; and Emily Apter, Professor of Romance Languages at Williams College. Betsky explains the lecture is part of course at SCI-Arc called, Architecture, Theatricality, and Monumentality in the Age of Revolutions: Paris/Berlin, 1780-1820. A course taught by Anthony Vidler and Kurt Forster. Betsky states the panel will discuss post-modernism and address questions such as, “Can the post-modern city be read,” and the relation of architecture to the city.


Fritz Neumeyer-clip_5935

View the Full Video: Fritz Neumeyer
March 2, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Fritz Neumeyer reviews some of Mies’ work, including his 1923 concrete office building. Neumeyer rejects the traditional view that the design is rigid, rational and repetitious. He proposes that the building should be considered as reference to classicism. He later documents Mies’ use of concrete as a new material for expressive means. Neumeyer relates Mies’ work to Postmodernism and a broader theoretical discourse.


Fritz Neumeyer

March 2, 1988 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Fritz Neumeyer interprets Ludwig Mies van der Rohe as more varied and relevant to contemporary discourse than usually presented. He reviews the historical roots of Mies’s architecture and how they relate to the modern movement in general. He discusses Mies’s critical heritage, and his own research on Mies’ original notebooks. Neumeyer argues that Mies’s 1923 concrete office building should be seen as a response to classicism.

Clips

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Fritz Neumeyer-clip_5933
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Fritz Neumeyer-clip_5935
Fritz Neumeyer-clip_5935