Video Archive | Product design (2)

Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380
Yung Ho Chang discusses how he wanted to update the traditional Chinese folding privacy screen, typically made with a wood frame...
Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1487
Smith delivers a "behind the scenes look" at her work and its relationship to the current economic climate which she identifies...

Yung Ho Chang-clip_9380

View the Full Video: Yung Ho Chang
October 28, 2009 |

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Yung Ho Chang discusses how he wanted to update the traditional Chinese folding privacy screen, typically made with a wood frame and rice paper. He explains how he was able to construct a new design using Formica to replace both wood and rice paper. Chang shows a project which he says “is not directly related to architecture,” but then turns out to be “related to architecture thinking.” He shows a gourd-like fruit in China which is used as a utensil for scooping. Chang talks about how he decided to use the form to create the ceramic equivalent of the fruit to provide the same utility. He states that plastic, lightweight forms and other technologies are an active part of his firm’s practice. Chang shows his design for the upcoming Shanghai Corporate Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo. He cites the Centre Pompidou as the source of inspiration for the design. He describes the functions of the building for the World Expo as “performing architecture.” Chang concludes his talk by showing the vegetable garden at his office. Employees eat the vegetables for lunch. The firm is also designing furniture and clothing.


Stephanie Smith Lighten Up-clip_1487

View the Full Video: Stephanie Smith Lighten Up
November 19, 2008 | Video Lecturer:

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Smith delivers a “behind the scenes look” at her work and its relationship to the current economic climate which she identifies as a depression. She discusses the interests and the structure of her firm which is not just engaged in architecture but product design and ideas as well. She then addresses the influence of indigenous architecture on her recent work. An interest in collaborative design and construction is demonstrated with projects pursued at the annual High Desert Test Sites and with a set design project for the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. Finally she addresses the tensions between the role of architect and manufacturer.