Video Archive | Richard Neutra (11)

Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL...
Raymond Richard Neutra is the youngest son of architect Richard Neutra. His lecture focuses on the influences and Viennese roots...
Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL...
Eric Owen Moss introduces Neutra and touches upon the enduring connection between Vienna and Los Angeles. Neutra frames his...
Dana Cuff-clip_5379
Neil Denari introduces the Spring 2004 lecture series. Roger Sherman introduces Dana Cuff. Cuff remarks that her talk will focus...
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into...
Ray Kappe-clip_3474
Ray Kappe reviews the architects that established the modern Los Angeles and California style: Charles and Henry Greene, Irving...
Ray Kappe About His Work-clip_781
Ray Kappe presents his early solo projects starting from 1953. Following the work of the early modernists, these early projects...
Dione Neutra
Dione Neutra sings several folk songs from Italy, France and Switzerland, accompanying herself on the cello. She reads aloud from...
Dione Neutra-clip_4367
After an introduction by Shelly Kappe, who discusses her long relationship with Dione Neutra, Neutra speaks about her 700...

Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL Research House 1932 1940 And 1966 Significance And Survival

November 20, 2009 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Raymond Richard Neutra is the youngest son of architect Richard Neutra. His lecture focuses on the influences and Viennese roots of the VDL Research House (a.k.a. Neutra VDL Studio and Residences) in the Silver Lake district of Los Angeles. Neutra also discusses the influence that Frank Lloyd Wright, and Otto Wagner had on his father in terms of connecting with nature, using new technology and materials, and how these principles combine to act on the biological senses at the VDL compound. This video ends abruptly before the lecture ended.

Clips

Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL...
Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL Research House 1932 1940 And 1966 Significance And Survival-clip_2862
Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL...
Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL Research House 1932 1940 And 1966 Significance And Survival-clip_2866

Raymond Richard Neutra The Richard And Dion Neutra VDL Research House 1932 1940 And 1966 Significance And Survival-clip_2862

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Eric Owen Moss introduces Neutra and touches upon the enduring connection between Vienna and Los Angeles. Neutra frames his lecture as a personal perspective, and describes the VDL compound, its history, its significance, and its enduring relevance.


Dana Cuff-clip_5379

View the Full Video: Dana Cuff
February 14, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

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Neil Denari introduces the Spring 2004 lecture series. Roger Sherman introduces Dana Cuff. Cuff remarks that her talk will focus on large residential developments in Southern California covered in her upcoming book, “The Provisional City.” She comments on the role of public housing in shaping the urban and suburban landscape and the post-war American city. The federal government defined these trends through funding. She asks, “why did suburban development succeed and modern utopian visions fail, and why was the suburban home not a modern home?”


Frank Israel-clip_5113

View the Full Video: Frank Israel
February 16, 1995 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into four levels up the hill. He developed a pallet of materials that included copper, cedar, plaster, and other materials from the history and traditions of Berkeley. Another project was for a client near Tampa. This client already owned a house designed by Richard Neutra, and specifically requested that their new home be nothing like their Neutra home.


Ray Kappe-clip_3474

View the Full Video: Ray Kappe
April 3, 1991 |

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Ray Kappe reviews the architects that established the modern Los Angeles and California style: Charles and Henry Greene, Irving Gill, Rudolf Schindler, Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, and Harwell Hamilton Harris. Kappe defines himself as an architect specializing in wood post and beam construction, emphasizing a strong connection between interior and exterior, achieved by large expanses of glazing, most influenced by Harris, and Neutra. Kappe describes architectural practice in the 1950s as being much less concerned with minute details than contemporary architecture.


Ray Kappe About His Work-clip_781

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Ray Kappe presents his early solo projects starting from 1953. Following the work of the early modernists, these early projects are mostly single-family houses and apartments using the post and beam construction technique. Not interested in conventional building techniques, Kappe’s projects consist of structures with infill panels and carefully consider site relationships. Similar to the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and Richard Neutra, the skins of these buildings receive the same treatments as the interiors, contributing to the penetration of the exterior to the interior.


Dione Neutra

February 4, 1976 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Dione Neutra sings several folk songs from Italy, France and Switzerland, accompanying herself on the cello. She reads aloud from her autobiography, composed from correspondence between Richard Neutra and herself, with many stories and asides.

Clips

Dione Neutra-clip_4367
Dione Neutra-clip_4367
Dione Neutra-clip_4368
Dione Neutra-clip_4368
Dione Neutra-clip_4369
Dione Neutra-clip_4369
Dione Neutra recites from a letter composed by Richard Neutra to her mother prior to their marriage. Richard, working in Zurich...

Dione Neutra-clip_4367

View the Full Video: Dione Neutra
February 4, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

After an introduction by Shelly Kappe, who discusses her long relationship with Dione Neutra, Neutra speaks about her 700 letter-long correspondence with her husband, Richard and her use of this material in her autobiography. She sings folksongs, accompanying herself on the cello, including a piece from Piedmont in Italy, a French pre-revolutionary pastoral, and a Swiss song about calling the cows from the mountains. She discusses her husband’s success and continual lecture tours, but expresses her dissatisfaction with the degree of understanding conveyed by those who invited him.