Video Archive | Science (21)

Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4813
Elena Manferdini opens the symposium and introduces the panel. She outlines the role of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the...
Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4814
Hernan Diaz Alonso discusses the relevance of student theses within contemporary architectural practice. The panel discusses the...
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science
Manuel de Landa begins with a discussion of the difference between idealism and realism. He discusses materiality in differential...
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2004
Introduced by Eric Moss, Charles Jencks begins laying out the path his lecture will take. He talks about introducing architecture...
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2005
Charles Jencks describes modernism as a direct outcome of Western psychcology's obession with rational thinking and the desire to...
Jeffrey Kipnis-clip_1859
Jeffrey Kipnis introduces some cosmological themes into the discussion of part-to-whole relationships. He discusses how a change...
Fire In The Library Rachel Rosenthal And Richard Terrile...
Eugenia Butler, Rachel Rosenthal, and Richard Terrile discuss possible outcomes of the future. The audience questions the...
Fire In The Library Rachel Rosenthal And Richard Terrile...
Rosenthal asks how people might try to relate relativity, quantum physics, and other sciences to their own lives so that people...

Thesis Prep Symposium-clip_4813

View the Full Video: Thesis Prep Symposium
April 6, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Elena Manferdini opens the symposium and introduces the panel. She outlines the role of thesis at SCI-Arc, stressing the responsibility of students to seriously investigate the architectural implications of their topics. The panel discusses qualities exhibited by a good thesis, noting a balance between innovative ideas and effective communication. Wes Jones inquires about the difference between designers and architects. While conceding the importance of consulting with peers, the panel cautions against being over-influenced by others, and the sameness that results.


Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science

October 18, 2006 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Manuel de Landa begins with a discussion of the difference between idealism and realism. He discusses materiality in differential geometry as illustrated by the work of Frei Otto. De Landa goes on to use Frei Otto as an analogy to Gilles Deleuze’s engagement with science. De Landa discusses evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr’s concept of “population thinking.” He relates this to algorithm-based design methodologies. De Landa describes “intensive thinking” as an essential part of Deleuze’s thought. De Landa discusses Deleuze’s use of concept “topological differences.” He reviews how Carl Friedrich Gauss’s exploration of curved surfaces in differential geometry led to a new philosophy of space, and provided the framework for Albert Einstein’s spacetime.

Clips

Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1554
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1554
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1556
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1556
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1560
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1560
De Landa describes “intensive thinking” as an essential part of Deleuze’s thought.
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1562
Manuel De Landa Gilles Deleuze and Science-clip_1562

Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2004

Subclip

Introduced by Eric Moss, Charles Jencks begins laying out the path his lecture will take. He talks about introducing architecture to a new paradigm that should exploit all of the seven elements he claims are common threads through contemporary architecture. He stresses his belief that these seven points are part of a positive and dangerous emerging world view.


Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2005

Subclip

Charles Jencks describes modernism as a direct outcome of Western psychcology’s obession with rational thinking and the desire to figure out God’s laws through science. He reviews early physics to trace the lineage of four major architects of
high modernism. Jencks then goes on to describe attractors and chaotic relationships in the forefront of scientific and architectural discourse.


Jeffrey Kipnis-clip_1859

View the Full Video: Jeffrey Kipnis
March 20, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Jeffrey Kipnis introduces some cosmological themes into the discussion of part-to-whole relationships. He discusses how a change in the environment can cause a change in an entire network, creating emergent properties that can not be reversed. Events such as swarms are organized complex behavior that can not be reduces to parts, creating an environment for variation and communicative comprehension. Kipnis goes on to say that these types of part-to-whole relationships should suggest ways a designer might work with materials, creating a sense of cohesion within vast differences.