Video Archive | Signs (11)

Michael Sorkin-clip_4130
Sorkin argues that his work is based on human locomotion defining urban scale. This is how heights and edges are defined. Sorkin...
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm
Charles Jencks discusses architecture's shifting paradigm in accordance with seven emerging themes in contemporary architecture....
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2009
Charles Jencks talks about his last point in realizing the new shift in architecture, the enigmatic signifier. Jencks describes...
Dave Hickey-clip_4019
Dave Hickey reads from John Ruskin's The Seven Lamps of Architecture, The Stones of Venice, and "The Flamboyant...
Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe-clip_3008
Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe discusses the intersection within the field of architect. Rolfe explains that the sign of the intersection...
Werner Oechslin-clip_5955
Andrew Zago introduces Werner Oechslin, noting his influential career as teacher and writer. Oechslin begins by mentioning that a...
Steve Izenour-clip_4514
Izenour presents a project for the Army Corps of Engineers that deals with large scale communication at the scale of a highway on...
Steve Izenour-clip_4515
Izenour talks about the idea of explicit decoration and the decorated shed, and presents two related projects that the office has...

Michael Sorkin-clip_4130

View the Full Video: Michael Sorkin
February 17, 2010 | Video Lecturer:

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Sorkin argues that his work is based on human locomotion defining urban scale. This is how heights and edges are defined. Sorkin stresses that a city should not go on forever. He presents a project in Laos that integrated agriculture with city housing adjacent to industry to allow a mixture of uses. He describes the process of signifying green intentions with forms and orienting points created
through the integration of windmills and other elements. Sorkin endeavors to harmonize with a balance of all of the resources and necessities of life on a single site. He additionally includes his “Eight Neutralities” of every design: energy, economy, waste, food, water, air, temperature, and movement.


Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm

November 10, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Charles Jencks discusses architecture’s shifting paradigm in accordance with seven emerging themes in contemporary architecture. Using current architectural projects and current discoveries in science, Jencks argues for a more intricate architecture that uses orders of nature and laws of science to compliment emergent design processes that contain metaphors and signifiers to pursue meaning. Though he admits his vision is pristinely
positive, he cautions the kitsch usage will weaken the significance of architecture in mainstream culture.

Clips

Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2010
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2010
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2005
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2005
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2006
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2006
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2007
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2007
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2008
Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2008

Charles Jencks Towards A New Paradigm-clip_2009

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Charles Jencks talks about his last point in realizing the new shift in architecture, the enigmatic signifier. Jencks describes Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao as moving architecture from monument to landmark. He also talks about the computer revolution which makes projects like Gehry’s possible through combining logistics, design, and production into a seamless structure.


Dave Hickey-clip_4019

View the Full Video: Dave Hickey
November 14, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

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Dave Hickey reads from John Ruskin’s The Seven Lamps of Architecture, The Stones of Venice, and “The Flamboyant Architecture of the Valley of the Somme.” Hickey explains that Ruskin is concerned with precisely differentiating between nature, culture, material and language. Hickey adds further distinctions between seeing and knowing, arguing that what we see, we signify, and what we know, we conceptualize.


Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe-clip_3008

View the Full Video: Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe
April 4, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

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Jeremy Gilbert Rolfe discusses the intersection within the field of architect. Rolfe explains that the sign of the intersection is a reaction of the discipline of architecture to its own history as an art form, specifically the poetics of construction. He states that the language of building must change in order to serve a building’s presentation rather than its construction and essence.


Werner Oechslin-clip_5955

View the Full Video: Werner Oechslin
April 15, 1987 | Video Lecturer:

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Andrew Zago introduces Werner Oechslin, noting his influential career as teacher and writer. Oechslin begins by mentioning that a few days earlier he attended Peter Cook’s lecture at SCI-Arc, and was struck by the fact that even even when architectural approach emphasizes the spontaneous, a consistent methodology is present. Oechslin traces this tendency towards theoretical coherence back to the rediscovery of Vitruvius in the Renaissance, and the rise of scientific thinking. At that moment there were three categories of change: autonomy, institutions, and signs.


Steve Izenour-clip_4514

View the Full Video: Steve Izenour
January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

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Izenour presents a project for the Army Corps of Engineers that deals with large scale communication at the scale of a highway on an immense site. This was a competition to design a visitor’s center meant to promote the value of the organization to the public. The idea was to pick up on various types of buildings indigenous to South Carolina, specifically the farm building. What resulted is a simple building with a large scale roof and topped with an oversize two-dimensional Army Corps of Engineers insignia, making the building itself into a sign.


Steve Izenour-clip_4515

View the Full Video: Steve Izenour
January 1, 1977 | Video Lecturer:

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Izenour talks about the idea of explicit decoration and the decorated shed, and presents two related projects that the office has put more time and effort into than any other project. Explaining the difficulties with inventing an ornamental scale and technique and choosing appropriate and durable materials, Izenour presents their project for Best who asked for a new repeatable prototype to use for their stores. The second project is an inexpensive office building in downtown Philadelphia which had to be a simple shape, cheap, and built quickly, making it very difficult to incorporate elements that impart liveliness or relate it to the street.