Video Archive | Alison and Peter Smithson (8)

Michael Kubo Publishing Practices-clip_4235
Michael Kubo discusses Venturi and Scott-Brown's "Learning from Las Vegas," emphasizing the decisive influence of earlier...
Peter Cook-clip_9432
Peter Cook talks about “the necessity of people,” who are “more audacious than one’s self.” He mentions Peter and...
Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_480
Shelly Kappe asks Ron Herron about his background, from failed cabinet maker to architecture. While doing so, he reflects on the...
Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_499
Peter Cook describes to Shelly Kappe his view of London during the 1950s and 1960s. Cook outlines the rationale and tools of...
Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2201
Charles Jencks describes the move away from unmeaningful city design towards urban identification. Jencks talks about metaphor...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697
Charles Jencks describes the architectural scene in London after 1951 as an era of reinvention, focused on social housing. He...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture
Charles Jencks, starting from the reconstruction after World War II , reviews the evolution of current English architecture. He...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1698
Charles Jencks discusses the evolutionary process of Alison and Peter Smithson and their interest in topographical form. He...

Peter Cook-clip_9432

View the Full Video: Peter Cook
April 8, 1981 | Video Lecturer:

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Peter Cook talks about “the necessity of people,” who are “more audacious than one’s self.” He mentions Peter and Alison Smithson, Dennis Crompton, Ron Herron, and Cedric Price as people he admires. Cook shows a photograph of Arata Isozaki’s office and points out that in Tokyo it is sometimes hard to determine the primary and second structure of certain buildings. He also talks about a “Love Hotel” in Tokyo. Cook talks about heroic and practical aspects of architecture. He shows examples of work which are integrated with the ground rather than placed on top of the ground. He discusses projects; Plug-in City, Lump, and Sponge. Cook makes an analogy to patchwork quilting and architecture.


Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_480

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Shelly Kappe asks Ron Herron about his background, from failed cabinet maker to architecture. While doing so, he reflects on the professional scene in London during the 1950s and 1960s. When discussing his numerous jobs prior to his involvement in Archigram, he touches upon the influences that shaped his early career.


Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_499

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Peter Cook describes to Shelly Kappe his view of London during the 1950s and 1960s. Cook outlines the rationale and tools of Archigram, and why it pursued certain themes through exageration and satire. He discusses the influences of Archigram, as well as, Archigram’s influence on the current (1981) architectural scene.


Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2201

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Charles Jencks describes the move away from unmeaningful city design towards urban identification. Jencks talks about metaphor and identity and how many designers are more talk than action. He discusses social housing, presenting Team 10 as an example of a group that talked about the vernacular, but practiced an uncritical modernism.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697

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Charles Jencks describes the architectural scene in London after 1951 as an era of reinvention, focused on social housing. He describes how the Greater London Council implemented current planning theories at an urban scale resulting in failure. Jencks presents the Smithsons as a radical alternative to acceptable British norms and the emergence of Brutalism as a signifier of cultural change. He reviews Brutalism’s evolution through the projects of Dennis Lasden and others.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture

May 19, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Charles Jencks, starting from the reconstruction after World War II , reviews the evolution of current English architecture. He describes the styles and methods of the Smithsons, Cedric Price, Norman Foster, Archigram, James Stirling, and Ralph Erskine. Beginning at the Townscape movement and shifting to Brutalism, Pop Art, and Neo-Palladianism, Jencks discusses changing social trends, political tendencies, and architectural ideas that affected, advanced, and eventually asphyxiated the aspirations of each era.

Clips

Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1699
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1699
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Charles Jencks answers questions on contemporary, English architectural practice. He discusses Archigram's waning influence....
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1696
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1696
Charles Jencks begins in post-World War II England, discussing the politics behind the reconstruction in English cities according...

Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1698

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Charles Jencks discusses the evolutionary process of Alison and Peter Smithson and their interest in topographical form. He points out how Brutalism included a return to earlier “Townscape” ideals. This leads to a discussion of the work of James Stirling. Jencks discusses Stirling’s ability to use distance and form to create illusions and circulation resulting in an extremely expressionistic style. Using projects like the Leicester Engineering building and Olivetti Training Center, Jencks describes Stirling’s style, ambitions, and “demise.”