Video Archive | Social housing (7)

Willem Neutelings-clip_4380
Neutelings presents a series of residential projects, each representing a search for new types of living spaces. In one, he...
Eric Owen Moss Recollecting Forward-clip_3220
Eric Moss describes the execution of his large scale projects. He stresses the idea of capturing time, but not still time. He...
Samuel Mockbee And Rick Lowe Part One-clip_2735
Artist Rick Lowe discusses his excitement with the social process of interaction between people. He discusses the relationship...
Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2196
Charles Jencks talks about the Japanese machine aesthetic of the 1970s. He also discusses the idea of design syntax, and its use...
Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2201
Charles Jencks describes the move away from unmeaningful city design towards urban identification. Jencks talks about metaphor...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697
Charles Jencks describes the architectural scene in London after 1951 as an era of reinvention, focused on social housing. He...
Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1698
Charles Jencks discusses the evolutionary process of Alison and Peter Smithson and their interest in topographical form. He...

Willem Neutelings-clip_4380

View the Full Video: Willem Neutelings Part One
March 28, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

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Neutelings presents a series of residential projects, each representing a search for new types of living spaces. In one, he merges a typical row house with an apartment building. He discusses strategies for improving social housing, including the deployment of roof gardens. Neutelings stresses the importance of responding to urban scale and providing housing with a distinct character.


Samuel Mockbee And Rick Lowe Part One-clip_2735

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Artist Rick Lowe discusses his excitement with the social process of interaction between people. He discusses the relationship between artists and the institutions and clients they work. Lowe explains his community process for creating work and effecting social change. Mockbee discusses his work on a series of murals and paintings, and his desire to engage people with the culture of the South.


Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2196

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Charles Jencks talks about the Japanese machine aesthetic of the 1970s. He also discusses the idea of design syntax, and its use in a culture’s products. He describesan amalgamation of architectural languages that can rarely be found outside Japan’s industrialized cities. Jencks defines the style as tradition and contemporary issues colliding in harmony.


Charles Jencks New Japanese Architecture-clip_2201

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Charles Jencks describes the move away from unmeaningful city design towards urban identification. Jencks talks about metaphor and identity and how many designers are more talk than action. He discusses social housing, presenting Team 10 as an example of a group that talked about the vernacular, but practiced an uncritical modernism.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1697

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Charles Jencks describes the architectural scene in London after 1951 as an era of reinvention, focused on social housing. He describes how the Greater London Council implemented current planning theories at an urban scale resulting in failure. Jencks presents the Smithsons as a radical alternative to acceptable British norms and the emergence of Brutalism as a signifier of cultural change. He reviews Brutalism’s evolution through the projects of Dennis Lasden and others.


Charles Jencks New British Architecture-clip_1698

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Charles Jencks discusses the evolutionary process of Alison and Peter Smithson and their interest in topographical form. He points out how Brutalism included a return to earlier “Townscape” ideals. This leads to a discussion of the work of James Stirling. Jencks discusses Stirling’s ability to use distance and form to create illusions and circulation resulting in an extremely expressionistic style. Using projects like the Leicester Engineering building and Olivetti Training Center, Jencks describes Stirling’s style, ambitions, and “demise.”