Video Archive | Space (59)

Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1877
Easterling documents her research in collaboration with students. The first step in this research involved the identification of...
James Turrell-clip_2383
Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California...
James Turrell-clip_2393
Turrell gives us some insight to the inspirations that stem from his childhood, and how that launched him on a trajectory of...
James Turrell-clip_2394
Turrell presents several projects that range from small-scale installations to an immense earthwork project at Roden Crater in...
James Turrell
James Turrell is an artist whose primary concern is light, space, and visual perception. Turrell discusses the psychology of...
Joep van Lieshout
Dutch artist, designer, and sculptor, Joep van Lieshout discusses his work. He considers himself an artist, i.e. “someone who...
Stanley Saitowitz
Following an introduction by Coy Howard, Stanley Saitowitz presents a range of projects which he categorizes as residential,...
Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6107
Where modernists ignore void space when designing cities, Portzamparc advocates returning to classical notions of urban design,...

Keller Easterling Believers and Cheaters-clip_1877

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Easterling documents her research in collaboration with students. The first step in this research involved the identification of global sites that exhibited certain characteristics. Each of these is described as a spatial product, similar to software (rather than hardware). Each is dislocated, measured by statistics and acronyms. Each is valued more as streams of data than a physical form. These sites include automated container ports in Hong Kong, golf courses in China, and the global demolition industry.


James Turrell-clip_2383

View the Full Video: James Turrell
March 27, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

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Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California Light and Space Movement of the late 1960’s, often referred to as the California branch of Minimalism. She explains that while Turrell has an affinity for the formal aspects of minimalism, his work is not about the constructed work, but rather about the experience of light and time.


James Turrell

March 27, 2002 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by: ,

James Turrell is an artist whose primary concern is light, space, and visual perception. Turrell discusses the psychology of perception, and how he uses light to inhabit space giving light a sensory experience akin to touch or taste. Through analysis of visual phenomenon he creates art that often uses architecture not as a medium but rather as a vessel through which his art is made manifest. Turrell presents numerous projects that range from small-scale installations to an immense earthwork project at Roden Crater in Arizona.

Clips

James Turrell-clip_2383
James Turrell-clip_2383
Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California...
James Turrell-clip_2393
James Turrell-clip_2393
Turrell gives us some insight to the inspirations that stem from his childhood, and how that launched him on a trajectory of...
James Turrell-clip_2394
James Turrell-clip_2394

Joep van Lieshout

January 23, 2002 |
Introduction by:

Dutch artist, designer, and sculptor, Joep van Lieshout discusses his work. He considers himself an artist, i.e. “someone who cannot stop doing what he’s doing … someone who follows his intuition and feelings.” Van Lieshout discusses some large installations, including a self-contained mobile home unit, and mobile trucks. He affirms that sexual objects are an important part of his work. He describes learning how to butcher meat, and shows several collaborations with Rem Koolhaas, including bars, sanitary units, and wash stands for the Grand Palais in Lille (1994).


Stanley Saitowitz

March 7, 2001 | Video Lecturer:

Following an introduction by Coy Howard, Stanley Saitowitz presents a range of projects which he categorizes as residential, urban, and public. Saitowitz describes his interest in residential work that is site specific, his struggles integrating certain structure and material types into the urban fabric of San Francisco, and his interest in connectivity in public projects. He expresses a desire to expand the role of space and the reduction of form, hoping to frame moments and events through his work.

Clips

Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2365
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2365
Themes:
Coy Howard introduces Stanley Saitowitz recounting a tale of artistry and identity that affected his first meeting with Saitowitz.
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2369
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2369
Stanley Saitowitz begins his lecture with an explanation of San Francisco, its landscape, diversity, history and the relationship...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2374
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2374
Saitowitz proceeds with his lecture, discussing several urban projects through which he has attempted to challenge conservative...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2376
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2376
Saitowitz describes a park in Indiana which integrates elements derived from site and program requirements. The original attempt...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2380
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_2380
Saitowitz concludes his lecture with a presentation of a synagogue and ceremonial objects and his New England Holocaust...

Christian De Portzamparc Part One-clip_6107

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Where modernists ignore void space when designing cities, Portzamparc advocates returning to classical notions of urban design, where the street is a multi-use circulation path to which buildings align. Modernism was successful in housing large numbers of people, however styles that are alienating can be considered succesful.