Video Archive | Space (59)

Michael Speaks
Michael Speaks discusses the relevance of young Dutch architects and talks about Dutch firms Crimson, MAX.1, NL Architects, and...
Marc Mimram
Marc Mimram discusses his architectural engineering projects. He proposes space is a material and discusses the relation of...
Ray Kappe-clip_1235
SCI-Arc's pedigree is showcased during the introduction of Ray Kappe. Michael Rotondi succeeded Kappe as Director of SCI-Arc, and...
Ray Kappe-clip_1269
Ray Kappe concludes his lecture by explaining his architectural principles. He describes that a house should be sympathetic with...
Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6110
Wolf Prix begins this conversation with students by speaking about working with clients. He recalls how one design lost the...
Ed Soja-clip_5653
Ed Soja proposes "Third Space," an alternative critical spatial awareness in which everything social, historical, imagined,...
Ed Soja
Ed Soja attempts to make sense of contemporary Los Angeles and to document the emergence of spatial thinking and geographical...
Ed Soja-clip_5651
Marco Cenzatti introduces Ed Soja, identifying important themes of his research and writing, including economic restructuring,...

Michael Speaks

November 18, 1998 |
Introduction by:

Michael Speaks discusses the relevance of young Dutch architects and talks about Dutch firms Crimson, MAX.1, NL Architects, and One Architecture. Speaks included these firms in “Big Soft Orange,” a 1999 exhibition, which he curated. Speaks emphasizes the importance of research as a tool of architectural practice and how “we must all become historians of the near-past” to work as “scenario-makers” in the future. He also talks about the work of architects and critics which guides his work in particular, Alejandro Zaera-Polo. He explains the use of “datascapes” to produce architectural form and an application called “orgware.” Speaks shows design work by architect Greg Lynn.


Marc Mimram

Marc Mimram discusses his architectural engineering projects. He proposes space is a material and discusses the relation of structural members in space and continuity. He shows the design of a roadway and toll booth and describes the construction of its steel forms and talks about “catching the light inside the structure.” Mimram highlights the design of a 150-foot-high light tower, and a high voltage electric tower. He speaks about the void and feeling gravity in his work and the connection to the horizon line. He talks about how the structural void gives his work rigidity.


Ray Kappe-clip_1235

View the Full Video: Ray Kappe
September 10, 1997 |

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SCI-Arc’s pedigree is showcased during the introduction of Ray Kappe. Michael Rotondi succeeded Kappe as Director of SCI-Arc, and he introduces the new director, Neil Denari, who in turn, introduces Kappe. Denari mentions projects that influenced Kappe, and describes Kappe’s works in terms of still-vital modernist ideas.

 


Ray Kappe-clip_1269

View the Full Video: Ray Kappe
September 10, 1997 |

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Ray Kappe concludes his lecture by explaining his architectural principles. He describes that a house should be sympathetic with nature, providing minimum separation from the elements, and emphasize space perception. He finishes with a ten-minute silent slide show of his projects, followed by a few more words about SCI-Arc.


Wolf Prix Discussion-clip_6110

View the Full Video: Wolf Prix Discussion
March 20, 1997 |

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Wolf Prix begins this conversation with students by speaking about working with clients. He recalls how one design lost the original client but then found another. Michael Rotondi asks about “building the sketch.” Prix stresses the “moment of conception” and claims that the sketch contains light, shadow, smells and tactile senations, and thus, connects the head and the heart. He states that architecture is more than constructed space and that it should provoke.


Ed Soja-clip_5653

View the Full Video: Ed Soja
February 5, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Ed Soja proposes “Third Space,” an alternative critical spatial awareness in which everything social, historical, imagined, experienced, and spatial comes together. He discusses the precedence of the spatial imagination over the historical imagination in contemporary architectural education. Soja critiques thinking about space as material form, stressing the importance of imagined space.


Ed Soja

February 5, 1997 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Ed Soja attempts to make sense of contemporary Los Angeles and to document the emergence of spatial thinking and geographical imagination. He analyzes the term “restructuring,” identifying it as a concrete process. Soja frames Los Angeles as an image of American cities as a whole. Soja proposes “Third Space,” an alternative critical spatial awareness in which everything social, historical, imagined, experienced, and spatial comes together. He discusses the precedence of the spatial imagination over the historical imagination in contemporary architectural education. Soja critiques thinking about space as material form, stressing the importance of imagined space.

Clips

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