Video Archive | Space (59)

Jay Fellows And Dan Graham-clip_6119
Andrew Zago introduces Jay Fellows. Fellows recites a passage from Charles M. Doughty's Travels in Arabia Deserta (1888)...
Dan Graham-clip_9003
Dan Graham describes his work and shows photographs and videos of various projects. He describes his installations as...
Dan Graham
Dan Graham describes his various pavilion installations, and explains that he is only interested in pavilions as exhibition space...
Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call...
Silvetti states that the goal of his engagement with space is to correlate various types of discourses. He argues that when...
Marc Treib Dichotomies Of Dwelling-clip_363
Marc Treib discusses the flexible, fluid, additive spaces of 17th century Edo architecture, and points out similarities and...
Christian Norberg Schulz-clip_4809
After being introduced, Christian Norberg-Schulz discusses figurative and abstract architecture, the idea of meaning in...
Studio Works Part Two
Robert Mangurian and Craig Hodgetts continue their lecture on their firm Studio Works. Hodgets and Mangurian reflect on their...
Bernard Tschumi Part One-clip_3110
Tschumi describes his discovery that many Los Angeles based artists had been investigating ideas akin to his own explorations. He...

Jay Fellows And Dan Graham-clip_6119

View the Full Video: Jay Fellows And Dan Graham
April 1, 1987 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Andrew Zago introduces Jay Fellows. Fellows recites a passage from Charles M. Doughty’s Travels in Arabia Deserta (1888) to introduce his theme of post-Ptolemaic infinite space as
a source of pleasure (Giordano Bruno) or terror (Blaise Pascal), and attempts by writers to create a new kind of integrated center for habitation.


Dan Graham-clip_9003

View the Full Video: Dan Graham
December 1, 1986 | Video Lecturer:

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Dan Graham describes his work and shows photographs and videos of various projects. He describes his installations as “somewhere between architecture and sculpture.” He states one of the questions he asked himself is how to get away from “utopian self-contained objects.” Graham explains he is only interested in pavilions as exhibition space. He shows images of Opposing Mirrors and Video Monitors on Time Delay, 1974. He describes how his installations function and can be perceived. Other projects he discusses include; a pavilion installed in a residential neighborhood, a Pavilion for Children, private garden, 1988, and Public Space/Two Audiences for the “Ambiente/Arte,” Venice Biennale , 1976. A piece which Graham says thematically addresses the history of environments. He also shows his plan for Clinic for a Suburban Site, 1978. He states Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion is the pavilion form which interests him. For Graham, Mies’s glass pavilion showed that “nature could exist in a cubist play of reflections, as a collage on the exterior of the glass.”


Dan Graham

December 1, 1986 | Video Lecturer:

Dan Graham describes his various pavilion installations, and explains that he is only interested in pavilions as exhibition space rather than creating a sculpture for a museum. He talks about the influence of Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion and the effect of how “nature could exist in a cubist play of reflections.” Graham talks about his work as “somewhere between architecture and sculpture,” and his interest in their intersection while avoiding “utopian self-contained objects.” In describing his “favorite unbuilt project,” Graham states the “cinematic” is a component of all architecture. Graham describes his preference for a limited palette of materials and avoiding color.

Clips

Dan Graham-clip_9003
Dan Graham-clip_9003

Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call Things By Their Rightful Name-clip_4147

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Silvetti states that the goal of his engagement with space is to correlate various types of discourses. He argues that when discussing representation, important boundaries are blurred or forgotten. Discourses are based on forgotten metaphors. He emphasizes the importance of the historical context, quoting Gotthold Ephraim Lessing and Rosalind Krauss regarding boundaries, space and sculpture. He characterizes the work of sculptors and painters as immediate, contrasted with musicians and architects, who require the intermediate step of performance.


Marc Treib Dichotomies Of Dwelling-clip_363

View the Full Video: Marc Treib Dichotomies Of Dwelling
January 23, 1986 | Video Lecturer:

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Marc Treib discusses the flexible, fluid, additive spaces of 17th century Edo architecture, and points out similarities and differences in the work of Hiroshi Hara and Tadao Ando. Treib discusses the work of Hara and Ando as based on walls, that disrupt traditional Japanese infinite space with finite divisions. However their work retains traditional cool neutrality, as well as dramatic effects of hiding and revealing views.


Studio Works Part Two

Robert Mangurian and Craig Hodgetts continue their lecture on their firm Studio Works. Hodgets and Mangurian reflect on their shared interest in building models with erector sets or making model airplanes. They explain how this led to their corrugated cardboard furniture, and the collaborative process of the furniture’s fabrication. They emphasize their interest in collaboration and note their desire to create work where the design of a building is participatory; where the design is dictated by putting one part on another in a given order.

Clips

Studio Works Part Two-clip_7063
Studio Works Part Two-clip_7063

Bernard Tschumi Part One-clip_3110

View the Full Video: Bernard Tschumi Part One
January 1, 1978 | Video Lecturer:

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Tschumi describes his discovery that many Los Angeles based artists had been investigating ideas akin to his own explorations. He discusses his work on an art exhibition and another project which he sees as a reaction against attempts to understand architecture through other disciplines. He feels the question, “What is space?” typically prompts two responses. First, that space is about memory and the past. Second, that space is about subjectivity within architecture.