Video Archive | Stairs (8)

Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3637
Jeffrey Kipnis discusses in depth, Le Corbusier's Five Points of Architecture, stressing their impact on modernism. He suggests...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu discuss their installation "Live Wire" with Eric Owen Moss. Created in collaboration with the...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Eric Owen Moss introduces Los Angeles-based architects and SCI-Arc Studio Design Faculty Members, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, and...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu characterize "Live Wire" as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how "Live Wire" inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the...
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4646
Ad?le Santos presents a house project which she says has two faces: the very private side facing the street, and the garden...
Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4648
Ad?le Santos discusses Kachofugetsu-kan, a project for a client in Japan who wanted a building for his offices, plus an art...
Paffard Keatinge Clay In Defense Of Offense-clip_3409
Keatinge-Clay concludes with his work on several hospital projects which require internal flexibility. He presents a high rise...

Jeff Kipnis Thesis Prep Talk Part Two-clip_3637

Subclip

Jeffrey Kipnis discusses in depth, Le Corbusier’s Five Points of Architecture, stressing their impact on modernism. He suggests that architecture sacrifices its objecthood in order to reinforce its importance. According to Kipnis, architecture serves power but ultimately undermines power structures.


Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire

Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu discuss their installation “Live Wire” with Eric Owen Moss. Created in collaboration with the engineering firm Buro Happold, Oyler and Wu characterize “Live Wire” as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial potential of the existing venue and strives to define an expanded relationship between tectonic expression and functional performance. The installation inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the gallery to the catwalk above and is constructed of approximately 2,400 linear feet of aluminum tubing and rods. The stair, often relegated to pure functional use, is a testing ground for weaving together a multitude of architectural ideas, ranging from the manipulation of light, geometry, and structure to vertical circulation.

Clips

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4334
Eric Owen Moss introduces Los Angeles-based architects and SCI-Arc Studio Design Faculty Members, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, and...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4335
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu characterize "Live Wire" as an attempt to occupy the SCI-Arc Gallery in a way that exploits the spatial...
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337
Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how "Live Wire" inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the...

Dwayne Oyler And Jenny Wu Live Wire-clip_4337

Subclip

Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu describe how “Live Wire” inserts a vertical circulation system, a stair, linking the floor level of the gallery to the catwalk above and is constructed of approximately 2,400 linear feet of aluminum tubing and rods. The stair, often relegated to pure functional use, is a testing ground for weaving together a multitude of architectural ideas, ranging from the manipulation of light, geometry, and structure to vertical circulation. “Live Wire” is aimed at suggesting an expanded definition of architectural elements, one that surpasses boundaries of simple functions and suggests intangible results.


Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4646

View the Full Video: Ad?le Naud? Santos
November 1, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ad?le Santos presents a house project which she says has two faces: the very private side facing the street, and the garden facing side that flows with the landscape. The house opens up as you move around it. From the children’s room on the second level, they can see out but people can’t see in. The disconnection between the geometries of the first and second floor creates terraces and opportunities for ventilation. Santos also shows a series of projects in which she explored a habitable staircase, and ways of cutting through spaces to allow the penetration of light.


Ad?le Naud? Santos-clip_4648

View the Full Video: Ad?le Naud? Santos
November 1, 1989 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Ad?le Santos discusses Kachofugetsu-kan, a project for a client in Japan who wanted a building for his offices, plus an art gallery on a site barely big enough for a house. In the resulting terraced building provides each office on every floor with a different view, and a theater space. Another project for the same client called Tokyo Fantasia also features a zigzagging staircase and invites the public to pass through it like a street.


Paffard Keatinge Clay In Defense Of Offense-clip_3409

Subclip

Keatinge-Clay concludes with his work on several hospital projects which require internal flexibility. He presents a high rise tower based on a spiral staircase. In this design he integrates his ideas of street spaces and rooftop spaces from previous projects into a larger scale, and attempts to evoke a sense of dancing between two adjoining structures.