Video Archive | Technology (117)

Bud Goldstone
Bud Goldstone, a retired Rockwell International engineer discusses the technologies that emerged from the aerospace industry,...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9373
Bud Goldstone talks about the useful technologies which emerged from Rockwell International's work with NASA on the space shuttle...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9374
Bud Goldstone says there were 5,000 inventions as a result of the Apollo program. He mentions several analytical studies based on...
Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_521
In conversation with Shelly Kappe, Peter Cook tries to classify himself in terms of desire and mode of working. He talks about...
Carolyn Dry Underwater Housing-clip_4355
Carolyn Dry argues that the primary issue architects should be addressing today is the relationship between technology and...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman describes the first of his points, the "Loss of Center." He offers the idea that traditionally Man has a...
Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social...
Peter Eisenman introduces four absences, or "Losses," then describes a Venice competition that will later embody the four points...
Frank Gehry And Roland Coate
Shelly Kappe interviews Frank Gehry and Roland Coate. Gehry talks about his eclectic influences, working for artists, and his...

Bud Goldstone

Bud Goldstone, a retired Rockwell International engineer discusses the technologies that emerged from the aerospace industry, focusing on inventions developed between Rockwell and NASA during the Space Shuttle program. Speaking of NASA, Goldstone says “It’s the only branch of the government that’s worth a damn, really.” He shows a silent film of a space flight with commentary by astronauts Robert Crippen and John Young. He mentions the NASA Tech Briefs, a quarterly publication which describes new technologies developed by the aerospace program. Goldstone emphasizes the availability of this information to public and the opportunities to make money based on these inventions. He talks about the largest, most beneficial technologies from the space program: integrated circuits, cryogenic insulation, gas turbines, and NASA’s NASTRAN computer program. Goldstone details spin-off products which resulted from the space program, such as “Sound Guard,” originally developed as a spray for motors, that is now sprayed on vinyl records to protect and improve sound quality.

Clips

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Bud Goldstone-clip_9371
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Bud Goldstone discusses aerospace technology. He states he just retired from Rockwell International. He says the space shuttle...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9372
Bud Goldstone-clip_9372
Themes: ,
Bud Goldstone shows a film in which astronauts Robert Crippen and John Young ad-lib a voice commentary to silent footage...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9373
Bud Goldstone-clip_9373
Themes: ,
Bud Goldstone talks about the useful technologies which emerged from Rockwell International's work with NASA on the space shuttle...
Bud Goldstone-clip_9374
Bud Goldstone-clip_9374
Bud Goldstone says there were 5,000 inventions as a result of the Apollo program. He mentions several analytical studies based on...

Bud Goldstone-clip_9373

View the Full Video: Bud Goldstone
November 18, 1981 |

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Bud Goldstone talks about the useful technologies which emerged from Rockwell International’s work with NASA on the space shuttle since 1973, including fuel cells, advanced computer analyses and computer terminals. Goldstone says, “There’s a little bit of every technology that came out of the shuttle.” He recommends the NASA Tech Briefs, a quarterly publication which describes new technologies developed by the aerospace program. Goldstone discusses how much is exported, compared to aerospace technologies. He says there is “a 2.6 cost benefit ratio” meaning for every dollar spent for aerospace development, the return is 2.6 dollars. He cites developments such as integrated circuits, cryogenic insulation, gas turbines, and NASA’s NASTRAN computer program are the largest contributors to the financial benefits. Goldstone talks about adverse changes in government funding for the space program.


Bud Goldstone-clip_9374

View the Full Video: Bud Goldstone
November 18, 1981 |

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Bud Goldstone says there were 5,000 inventions as a result of the Apollo program. He mentions several analytical studies based on photographs from the space missions; including one in which shellfish production is measured by the color of the water, and other studies evaluating land use. He details spin-off products which resulted from the space program. Goldstone discusses Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic domes as part of the space program. He also mentions a Teflon-coated fabric used for the roof of the Detroit Tigers stadium, and other architectural applications of aerospace technologies. He mentions a hand-held laser wire-stripper invented during the space program which he predicts will “become a 100 million-dollar-a-year industry.” He also mentions other products and devices, such as robotics which can have the potential to make money for anyone wanting to get involved. Goldstone shares a list of 2000 NASA inventions currently not being developed. He encourages the audience to consider these as opportunities in which to make money. Among the inventions discussed between Goldstone and the audience is a drafting ink dryer.


Peter Cook And Ron Herron Interview-clip_521

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In conversation with Shelly Kappe, Peter Cook tries to classify himself in terms of desire and mode of working. He talks about his expectations from students and their ability to visualize their projects as real world construction. He closes by describing a few student works and their relevance to his method of teaching.


Carolyn Dry Underwater Housing-clip_4355

View the Full Video: Carolyn Dry Underwater Housing
January 1, 1981 | Video Lecturer:

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Carolyn Dry argues that the primary issue architects should be addressing today is the relationship between technology and ecology. Going beyond just energy issues, today’s projects should consider how designs that are made for a physical world are going to relate to that physical world. She is currently working with the Navy to develop new ways of building that are appropriate for the oceans. She began by thinking about what and how ocean organisms might build for themselves. An example of this is her interest in using an electrolytic process of precipitating calcium and magnesium out of ocean water to create a building material that adapts to the amount of force exerted on it over time.


Peter Eisenman My Work As It Relates To Social Guilt-clip_944

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Peter Eisenman describes the first of his points, the “Loss of Center.” He offers the idea that traditionally Man has a hierarchical belief system with either God, Man, or Nature as the center of the system. As technology became the center, Man developed a keen obsession to machines and industrialization culminating into the two great tragedies of modern civilization, the Holocaust and Hiroshima. These two events, revealed to the world over a relatively short time, resulted in Man ejecting technology from the center. With no replacement, Man now exists without a center for any belief system.


Frank Gehry And Roland Coate

April 23, 1976 | Video Lecturer:

Shelly Kappe interviews Frank Gehry and Roland Coate. Gehry talks about his eclectic influences, working for artists, and his interest in education. Roland Coate describes his current influences, the integration of work and life, and the frustrating inaccessisiblity of much new technology.

Clips

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