Video Archive | Temporality (8)

Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots
Stephen Phillips describes several of Frederick Kiesler's most significant designs, including the 1962 Universal...
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5831
Stephen Phillips describes several of Frederick Kiesler's most significant designs, including the 1962 Universal Theater concept...
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5833
Phillips describes how Kiesler, while teaching at Columbia and Yale, did research into human motion and perception. Phillips...
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5835
Todd Gannon joins Stephen Phillips to discuss the nature of Kiesler's work and his impact on architecture. They credit Kiesler...
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung
Craig Hodgetts and Ming Fung discuss their design philosophies and how they work together. They describe their early work and...
Richard Warner-clip_5388
Richard Warner explains his work with plastic, fabric, and other low-cost materials as a response to working with clients with...
Achva Benzinberg Stein Education Work And Mutual...
Stein discusses connecting landscapes now to landscapes of the past. She presents a project in San Francisco in which an ice...
Peter Zumthor-clip_2488
Zumthor argues that if its body is sensitive enough, architecture exposed to life can develop richness and depth. He explores the...

Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots

September 30, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Stephen Phillips describes several of Frederick Kiesler’s most significant designs, including the 1962 Universal Theater concept for a show at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in New York. Kiesler believed that traditional architecture lacks the adaptability and flexibility necessary to meet the demands of modern society. Kiesler’s proposals incorporated the temporal variation of space and form to synchronize with the human body’s rhythms. Phillips describes how Kiesler, while teaching at Columbia and Yale, did research into human motion and perception. Phillips presents a number of Kiesler’s installations that illustrate Kiesler’s ambition to engage the viewer in novel ways. Beyond employing movable elements, Kiesler proposed flexible, expanding and contracting spaces. Todd Gannon joins Phillips to discuss the nature of Kiesler’s work and his impact on architecture. They credit Kiesler with being the first to insist on the value of architectural ideas that aren’t realized. They discuss Kiesler’s obsession with control, always to the service of the corporate good, and the social and political implications of this view. Phillips discusses Kiesler’s Endless House project, and his embrace of contemporary trends. Though ignored by both the modernists and the postmodernists, Phillips argues that Kiesler is one of the greatest architects of the 20th century, and one whose ideas are still relevant.

Clips

Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5830
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5830
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5831
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5831
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5833
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5833
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5835
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5835
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5836
Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5836
Phillips discusses Kiesler's Endless House project, and his embrace of contemporary trends. Though ignored by both the...

Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5831

Subclip

Stephen Phillips describes several of Frederick Kiesler’s most significant designs, including the 1962 Universal Theater concept for a show at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in New York. Kiesler believed that traditional architecture lacks the adaptability and flexibility necessary to meet the demands of modern society. Kiesler’s proposals incorporated the temporal variation of space and form to synchronize with the human body’s rhythms.


Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5833

Subclip

Phillips describes how Kiesler, while teaching at Columbia and Yale, did research into human motion and perception. Phillips presents a number of Kiesler’s installations that illustrate Kiesler’s ambition to engage the viewer in novel ways. Beyond employing movable elements, Kiesler proposed flexible, expanding and contracting spaces.


Stephen Phillips Kiesler’s Robots-clip_5835

Subclip

Todd Gannon joins Stephen Phillips to discuss the nature of Kiesler’s work and
his impact on architecture. They credit Kiesler with being the first to insist on the value of architectural ideas that aren’t realized. They discuss Kiesler’s obsession with control, always to the service of the corporate good, and the social and political implications of this view.


Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung

November 19, 1997 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Craig Hodgetts and Ming Fung discuss their design philosophies and how they work together. They describe their early work and influences. They show projects in which spaces are framed by architecture. They discuss different layers present in their work, especially to engage people and induce an emotional
reaction. They describe certain construction techniques that link several of the projects together. They discuss the importance of pride and craftsmanship in their work. They also stress the need to remain playful and how their works tries to contain an air of whimsy to retain a certain lightness. They discuss technical and aesthetic aspects of their more recent work.

Clips

Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5544
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5544
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5545
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5545
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5546
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5546
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5547
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5547
Craig Hodgetts and Ming Fung discuss a project that tries to capture the spectacle of Hollywood cinematically, while also...

Richard Warner-clip_5388

View the Full Video: Richard Warner
March 3, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Richard Warner explains his work with plastic, fabric, and other low-cost materials as a response to working with clients with limited budgets. Warner documents a series of completed projects, beginning with a children’s playhouse for an exhibition. He explains the use of lightweight, fabric construction. Warner presents a clothing store in Santa Monica and a house in Malibu. Warner concludes with his furniture and product design, citing the influence of Art Deco.


Achva Benzinberg Stein Education Work And Mutual Obligations-clip_5234

Subclip

Stein discusses connecting landscapes now to landscapes of the past. She presents a project in San Francisco in which an ice enclosure shed alfalfa seeds as it melted. Stein follows her lecture with a question and answer session in which she comments on the issue of environmental remediation, stating that you can never truly restore nature, but you can attempt to balance natural systems.