Video Archive | Time (26)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss presents the horse from Victor Sj?str?m's 1928 movie The Wind as an image of embodying abstract forces in...
Jason Payne Rawhide Gallery-clip_3781
The piece Payne fabricated for the gallery installation will ultimately form the roof of a house currently under construction....
Ed Soja Putting Cities First-clip_3084
Soja describes his idea of publishing ten books before he dies. The first five books would be The Great Ontological...
James Turrell-clip_2383
Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California...
James Turrell-clip_2393
Turrell gives us some insight to the inspirations that stem from his childhood, and how that launched him on a trajectory of...
James Turrell-clip_2394
Turrell presents several projects that range from small-scale installations to an immense earthwork project at Roden Crater in...
James Turrell
James Turrell is an artist whose primary concern is light, space, and visual perception. Turrell discusses the psychology of...
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_5547
Craig Hodgetts and Ming Fung discuss a project that tries to capture the spectacle of Hollywood cinematically, while also...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 2-clip_9586

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Eric Owen Moss presents the horse from Victor Sj?str?m’s 1928 movie The Wind as an image of embodying abstract forces in a compelling, concrete form. He argues the value of getting away from what’s known, understood and “works,” in favor of continuously exploring possibilities. Moss contrasts two images of the relationship of time and architecture: a building at Angkor Wat through which a tree has grown, and Ise Grand Shrine, entirely rebuilt every twenty years. He presents three types of relationship between the individual and the public space: the Athenian Acropolis, the Qin terra cotta warriors, and a Nazi rally at Nuremberg. Moss concludes with an image of architectural conflict: Trajan’s public baths built on top of Nero’s Domus Aurea.


Jason Payne Rawhide Gallery-clip_3781

View the Full Video: Jason Payne Rawhide Gallery
July 29, 2011 | Video Lecturer: ,

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The piece Payne fabricated for the gallery installation will ultimately form the roof of a house currently under construction. Payne describes his interest in the roof as an object in the gallery versus an actual house on a site. Different aspects are stressed in the different contexts. Moss questions Payne’s decision to create a new-old building through the pre-weathering of shingles.


Ed Soja Putting Cities First-clip_3084

View the Full Video: Ed Soja Putting Cities First
February 28, 2007 | Video Lecturer:

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Soja describes his idea of publishing ten books before he dies. The first five books would be The Great Ontological Distortion on the relationship of geography, history and time, Parisian Reversals on urban spatial causality, The Spatial Turn on transdisciplinary diffusion, The City in Geohistory on the first urban settlements, and Re-Spatializing Aristotle on being political and being urban.


James Turrell-clip_2383

View the Full Video: James Turrell
March 27, 2002 | Video Lecturer:

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Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California Light and Space Movement of the late 1960’s, often referred to as the California branch of Minimalism. She explains that while Turrell has an affinity for the formal aspects of minimalism, his work is not about the constructed work, but rather about the experience of light and time.


James Turrell

March 27, 2002 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by: ,

James Turrell is an artist whose primary concern is light, space, and visual perception. Turrell discusses the psychology of perception, and how he uses light to inhabit space giving light a sensory experience akin to touch or taste. Through analysis of visual phenomenon he creates art that often uses architecture not as a medium but rather as a vessel through which his art is made manifest. Turrell presents numerous projects that range from small-scale installations to an immense earthwork project at Roden Crater in Arizona.

Clips

James Turrell-clip_2383
James Turrell-clip_2383
Ming Fung introduces James Turrell as an artist whose work is important to architecture. Fung links Turrell with the California...
James Turrell-clip_2393
James Turrell-clip_2393
Turrell gives us some insight to the inspirations that stem from his childhood, and how that launched him on a trajectory of...
James Turrell-clip_2394
James Turrell-clip_2394