Video Archive | Tools (9)

ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
Greg Otto opens the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)'s panel discussion of the current state of...
ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
Tom Wiscombe illustrates with examples of his own work arguments for mystery, the autonomy of architecture, the need to...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss's SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...
Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4829
Sanford Kwinter shifts his focus from the evolution of organisms to the evolution of specific organs, such as the thumb and the...
Tom Farrage Architectural Implements And...
Farrage discusses the incorporation of envelopes into his projects, as well as artwork and furniture. He shows samples of his...
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay
Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki's translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He...
Yansong Ma MAD Dinner-clip_3363
Ming Fung introduces Yansong Ma in the context of the current Chinese economy, and China's culture and arts. She discusses his...

ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in the Digital Age

Greg Otto opens the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)’s panel discussion of the current state of design and design tools. Marcelyn Gow discusses the disconnect between exacting processes and illegible outcomes. Tom Wiscombe argues for mystery, autonomy, critically breaking or misusing tools, and the exploration of architecture’s capacities. Alvin Huang discusses his work in terms of an exploratory practice focused on designing with technology. Roland Snooks discusses his explorations as a way of undermining the discrete reading of architectural elements. The panelists respond to a question posed by Greg Otto on digital tools and architectural fundamentals. The panelists respond to audience comments on issues that remain relevant or arise as new problems.

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ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
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ACADIA Conference Panel At SCI-Arc Design Aesthetics in...
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Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1

Jeffrey Kipnis describes this seminar as a debate on the issues Eric Owen Moss’s SCI-Arc directorship stressed, especially as they relate to the students’ imminent engagement with practice. For the first session, the topic is the pleasure of building. Eric Owen Moss responds to the topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, and then discusses in detail the Trivida office, and the Waffle building, stressing the relationship between design and realization. Kipnis and Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value.

 

 

Clips

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis describes the seminar, Look! You've got it all wrong! as an attempt to reflect on the issues Eric Owen...
Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9523

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Jeffrey Kipnis and Eric Owen Moss discuss the importance of designers anticipating what will be technological feasible, stressing the element of wonder or surprise as a core value. To a question about whether new tools help or hinder this wonder, Moss argues it’s a question of seeing where the tools haven’t been. Kipnis suggests that new tools never quite solve the problem they were designed to address, but, rather, create a new mode of practice.


Sanford Kwinter This Is Your Brain On Design-clip_4829

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Sanford Kwinter shifts his focus from the evolution of organisms to the evolution of specific organs, such as the thumb and the tooth. He describes how dietary and predatory challenges influenced their form and strength, hence significantly influencing human evolution. Kwinter begins describing how the human brain was able to evolve out of environmental influences.


Tom Farrage Architectural Implements And Contrivances-clip_1154

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Farrage discusses the incorporation of envelopes into his projects, as well as artwork and furniture. He shows samples of his work for the film industry. He discusses his project to serve as a social device for self-serve restaurants. He describes his collaboration with Patrick Tighe and Thom Mayne.


Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay

October 17, 2008 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki’s translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He explains the manner in which he creates his own tools and seeks to be innovative, as well as maintain tradition. He discusses his innovative methods and the science of mixing compound metals. He describes his design inspiration, derived from nature and its constant changes. He then explains his philosophy in teaching. Nakagawa discusses the necessity of having clear focus and minimizing distractions in order to concentrate on the production of work.

Clips

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Nakagawa discusses the inspiration for his designs which are derived by nature. He states that his goal is to always challenge...