Video Archive | Tradition (20)

Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay
Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki's translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He...
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222
Nakagawa discusses the inspiration for his designs which are derived by nature. He states that his goal is to always challenge...
Jorge Rigau-clip_2476
Jorge Rigau discusses the two positions present in the Hispanic Caribbean regarding contemporary architecture. The first...
Jorge Rigau-clip_2478
Jorge Rigau presents the project for a cafeteria in the San Juan Botanical Garden, a cemetery in Mayag?ez and a new urban plaza...
Jorge Rigau
Hector Perez introduces Jorge Rigau, principal at Jorge Rigau Architects in Puerto Rico. Rigau discusses contemporary...
Toyo Ito-clip_1851
Toyo Ito discusses his own home. He discusses how he has been influenced by primitive habitats. Yet he asks the question of how...
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064
Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that...
Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067
Stanley Tigerman's urban villa project for the Berlin IBA takes Mies Van Der Rohe's 1909 Perls House as a model for his...

Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay

October 17, 2008 | Video Lecturer: ,
Introduction by:

Mamoru Nakagawa, via Yoshio Ikezaki’s translation, explains the significance of being a Japanese Living National Treasure. He explains the manner in which he creates his own tools and seeks to be innovative, as well as maintain tradition. He discusses his innovative methods and the science of mixing compound metals. He describes his design inspiration, derived from nature and its constant changes. He then explains his philosophy in teaching. Nakagawa discusses the necessity of having clear focus and minimizing distractions in order to concentrate on the production of work.

Clips

Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1204
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1204
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1213
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1213
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1220
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1220
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222
Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222
Nakagawa discusses the inspiration for his designs which are derived by nature. He states that his goal is to always challenge...

Mamoru Nakagawa Kaga Zogan Metal Inlay-clip_1222

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Nakagawa discusses the inspiration for his designs which are derived by nature. He states that his goal is to always challenge himself, innovating as well as protecting tradition. He finds interest in nature due to its constantly changing quality. He moves on to discuss his philosophies of teaching. His approach is different due to his background and training and he is constantly looking for new and different types of inspiration. He states that part of his philosophy is to give all of his knowledge to his students and maintain a constant level of focus.


Jorge Rigau-clip_2476

View the Full Video: Jorge Rigau
October 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Jorge Rigau discusses the two positions present in the Hispanic Caribbean regarding contemporary architecture. The first advocates preservation and the need to validate design heritage. The second advocates accepting whatever is new in order to appear innovative. Rigau goes on to summarize ten years of research, and presents a series of projects that illustrate the contradictions.


Jorge Rigau-clip_2478

View the Full Video: Jorge Rigau
October 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:

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Jorge Rigau presents the project for a cafeteria in the San Juan Botanical Garden, a cemetery in Mayag?ez and a new urban plaza for the city of Carolina. Rigau characterizes his office as creating contemporary architecture that follows and is inspired by traditional references through re-translation and not by copying.

 


Jorge Rigau

October 9, 1996 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Hector Perez introduces Jorge Rigau, principal at Jorge Rigau Architects in Puerto Rico. Rigau discusses contemporary architecture in the Hispanic Caribbean islands, the relationship with Spanish and American influences. He reflects how his work has positioned itself on questions of identity for Latin American architecture.

 

Clips

Jorge Rigau-clip_2475
Jorge Rigau-clip_2475
Jorge Rigau proposes to embrace the challenges of the modern world by looking at the relationship between tradition and modernity...
Jorge Rigau-clip_2476
Jorge Rigau-clip_2476
Jorge Rigau-clip_2478
Jorge Rigau-clip_2478

Toyo Ito-clip_1851

View the Full Video: Toyo Ito
February 7, 1990 | Video Lecturer:

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Toyo Ito discusses his own home. He discusses how he has been influenced by primitive habitats. Yet he asks the question of how we can make similar structures today using new technologies and materials. He discusses a variety of various projects including other commissioned residential projects, an unrealized design, and a restaurant/bar in which a noh performance occurred.


Stanley Tigerman-clip_4064

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Tigerman presents a selection of his work and discusses the development and concepts behind each project. He claims that his work is in the central tradition of architecture in that it produces objects that synthesize disparate conditions. When discussing deconstructivism as an alternate approach, he says it is ethical because it reflects the issues of the day, but it does not try to build on or add anything new to work from the past. A house he designed with his partner and wife Margaret McCurry came from an interest in the language of rural America’s hybridized architecture.


Stanley Tigerman-clip_4067

View the Full Video: Stanley Tigerman
March 24, 1988 | Video Lecturer:

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Stanley Tigerman’s urban villa project for the Berlin IBA takes Mies Van Der Rohe’s 1909 Perls House as a model for his tripartite design. He did not want to simply do a contextual design because it infers a disillusionment with one’s own time. Instead, he took what looks like an ordinary house and split it in two, gridding and measuring the resulting gap with the cubit as a basic unit. Tigerman’s synagogue project which was not built looks back to the state of Judaism before and after Christ, and attempts to fuse the two.