Video Archive | UC Berkeley (10)

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All...
Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are...
Stanley Saitowitz
Stanley Saitowitz discusses several projects, mostly in north California. He argues that modernism offers two path--“form and...
Lars Lerup-clip_3664
Robert Mangurian introduces Lars Lerup, joking about meeting Lerup in Berkeley, Lerup's background in engineering and his...
Ernie Gehr Film And Architecture-clip_3066
Richard Kelly introduces Ernie Gehr as one of the most powerful and original artists in the world. His work has been shown at...
Frank Israel
This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Most likely it was UCLA. Frank Israel begins by admitting that although most architects...
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into...
Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005
Aaron Betsky introduces Michael Bell, characterizing his work as a simultaneous vertical dislocation and a horizontal extension,...
Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_789
Introduction by Robert Mangurian, in which he speaks of both the credentials of Hodgetts and Fung, as well as personal...

Jeffrey Kipnis & Eric Owen Moss Look You Got It All Wrong 1-clip_9521

Subclip

Eric Owen Moss responds to the proposed topic by describing his Penelope theory of architecture, in which building and making are necessarily accompanied by unmaking and doubt. He reviews important influences, including the radicalized environment of Berkeley in the 1960s, Corbusier’s proposed balance of Apollo and Dionysus, El Caracol in Chichen Itza, and Immanuel Velikovsky. He contrasts a sketch by Erich Mendelsohn with his later Einstein Tower, arguing that by failing to address
the implications of initial idea, Mendelsohn “built the outside of the sketch.”


Stanley Saitowitz

September 24, 2003 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

Stanley Saitowitz discusses several projects, mostly in north California. He argues that modernism offers two path–“form and meaning,” and “space and experience”–and he is “more interested in space than in meaning.” In describing his design of houses, he refers to them as “linear configurations” and “bar houses,” because you can look through them from one room to another. He describes in detail the renovation a Victorian building in San Francisco for his office. He shows the Embarcadero Ribbon in San Francisco, a public landscape project in which he collaborated with Vito Acconci and Barbara Staufacher. Saitowitz concludes with a statement explaining his interest in “expanded architecture.”

Clips

Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9283
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9283
Eric Owen Moss introduces Stanley Saitowitz by characterizing San Francisco and Los Angeles as thesis and antithesis, and...
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9287
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9288
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9288
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9289
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9289
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9290
Stanley Saitowitz-clip_9290

Ernie Gehr Film And Architecture-clip_3066

View the Full Video: Ernie Gehr Film And Architecture
March 8, 1995 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Richard Kelly introduces Ernie Gehr as one of the most powerful and original artists in the world. His work has been shown at MOMA in New York, the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, MOCA in Los Angeles as well as film festivals across Europe. He teaches at the San Francisco Art Institute and UC Berkeley. According to Kelly, his films are a result of his interest in the space and form of the city. They show us the cities we live in as they are, and remind us to look.


Frank Israel

This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Most likely it was UCLA. Frank Israel begins by admitting that although most architects hate their clients, they are important because there would be no work without them. Discussing a home addition project he did for Wesley and Marla Strick, he recalls that they asked for a third level to be added that could be a bedroom, living room, and bathroom in a single space. A house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, was on a steep site in Berkeley terraced into four levels up the hill. His School of the Arts project for UC Riverside combines the school’s programs in theater arts, music, dance, writing, sculpture, painting and art history under a single, complex roof.

Clips

Frank Israel-clip_5110
Frank Israel-clip_5110
This event did not take place at SCI-Arc. Richard Weinstein introduces Frank Israel, characterizing his work as an unforced...
Frank Israel-clip_5111
Frank Israel-clip_5111
Frank Israel-clip_5112
Frank Israel-clip_5112
Discussing a home addition project he did for Wesley and Marla Strick, Frank Israel recalls that they asked for a third level...
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel-clip_5113
Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into...
Frank Israel-clip_5114
Frank Israel-clip_5114
Frank Israel discusses the School of the Arts project for UC Riverside, which combines the school's programs in theater arts,...

Frank Israel-clip_5113

View the Full Video: Frank Israel
February 16, 1995 | Video Lecturer: ,

Subclip

Frank Israel discusses a house he designed for a married couple, both doctors, on a steep site in Berkeley that is terraced into four levels up the hill. He developed a pallet of materials that included copper, cedar, plaster, and other materials from the history and traditions of Berkeley. Another project was for a client near Tampa. This client already owned a house designed by Richard Neutra, and specifically requested that their new home be nothing like their Neutra home.


Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure-clip_5005

View the Full Video: Michael Bell Spatial Infrastructure
November 16, 1994 | Video Lecturer:

Subclip

Aaron Betsky introduces Michael Bell, characterizing his work as a simultaneous vertical dislocation and a horizontal extension, framing modernism in all of its centripetal and centrifugal movement. Having grown up in suburban Washington, D.C. he did his undergraduate work at Catholic University and completed a masters degree at UC Berkeley. According to Betsky, Bell creates a unstable context that crystallizes the dislocation between sensory reality and rational systems of coherence.


Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung-clip_789

View the Full Video: Craig Hodgetts And Ming Fung
October 13, 1993 | Video Lecturer: ,

Subclip

Introduction by Robert Mangurian, in which he speaks of both the credentials of Hodgetts and Fung, as well as personal experiences with them. Hodgetts attended Yale University and met Mangurian while a student at the University of California at Berkeley. Fung attended the University of California, Los Angeles and received a fellowship at the American Academy in Rome. Both have received many awards. Mangurian states that Hodgetts and Fung are doing what all architects should do, which would be to get involved and tackle as many issues as possible.