Video Archive | Urban design (78)

Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9576
Michael Sorkin outlines the current state of urban life worldwide, arguing that even as the globe becomes urbanized, the city as...
Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9577
Michael Sorkin discusses projects for new cities: Weed, Arizona (1994), Houguan Lake Ecological City (2010) and Qingtan Lake...
Michael Sorkin How Green Is My City-clip_9578
Michael Sorkin outlines his research into ways of enabling New York City to produce its own food.
Peter Trummer
Peter Trummer discusses his disciplinary approach and the aggregated figure and its unfolded ground. He discusses form not as a...
Jesse Reiser-clip_3693
Jesse Reiser presents Kaohsiung: The Harbor City, a design for a major cruise ship terminal and tourist center in Taipei. The...
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One
Prix discusses his interest in architecture as society rather than surface and form. He reccomends resistance to tools and...
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial Lecture
This lecture commemorates architect Raimund Abraham, who was teaching at SCI-Arc at the time of his death in 2010. In a talk...
Michael Sorkin-clip_4129
Michael Sorkin presents several urban design projects that demonstrate what he calls "a fuzzy urban logic." In his drawings,...

Jesse Reiser-clip_3693

View the Full Video: Jesse Reiser
September 26, 2011 | Video Lecturer:

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Jesse Reiser presents Kaohsiung: The Harbor City, a design for a major cruise ship terminal and tourist center in Taipei. The challenge with this project was to find a way to deal with the existing industrial aspects of the port while introducing postindustrial and touristic uses. The strategy was to go from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional urbanism which allows for simultaneous access to the waterfront for multiple user groups. Flexible use spaces are distributed throughout the project and can be combined for larger events.


Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One

September 19, 2011 |
Introduction by:

Prix discusses his interest in architecture as society rather than surface and form. He reccomends resistance to tools and technologies that push too narrowly in one direction. He argues that virtual public spaces without a physical component are not truly public. Prix presents a series of quotes, thoughts and ideas on complexity, problem solving, and rule-breaking. Prix presents several projects, describing the importance of finding new solutions without being distracted by the notion of a perfect solution. He explains his back and forth, analog and digital methodology. He argues that imperfections and chance occurrences can generate emotional content. He discusses client relationships in terms of the balance of what they want and what he hopes to achieve. He stresses the importance of fighting for projects, arguing that radical architecture is not just in the idea itself but in the building. Prix concludes with several projects of drastically differing scales. He addresses the integration of monumentality and dynamism. In principle he defends working in autocratic political contexts today as analogous to working for the Catholic Church in the past, but personally refuses to work on projects that conform to autocratic ideals. Prix discusses materials and fabrication, showing examples of ship building technologies combined with forms made from hand bent reeds.

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Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4876
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4876
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4877
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4878
Wolf Prix What’s the Difference Number One-clip_4878

Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial Lecture

March 2, 2011 | Video Lecturer:
Introduction by:

This lecture commemorates architect Raimund Abraham, who was teaching at SCI-Arc at the time of his death in 2010. In a talk specifically addressed to Abraham, Steven Holl reviews his recent work in terms of ambiguity of time, place, and scale, ambiguous systems, and programs, and the clarity of concepts.

Clips

Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial...
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial Lecture-clip_3657
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial...
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial Lecture-clip_3659
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial...
Steven Holl First Annual Raimund Abraham Memorial Lecture-clip_3661

Michael Sorkin-clip_4129

View the Full Video: Michael Sorkin
February 17, 2010 | Video Lecturer:

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Michael Sorkin presents several urban design projects that demonstrate what he calls “a fuzzy urban logic.” In his drawings, every visual or color difference represents a difference in the drawing process as well as the urban makeup. The ratios of built space to green space to water space are all crucial. For Sorkin, sustainable urbanism is deliminated, body based, self sufficient, local, complex, equitable, singular, and green. For Sorkin, successful urbanism involves the ability to get lost, stating that “a little confusion is good.”