Video Archive | Views (6)

Margaret Griffin-clip_3823
Griffin continues her lecture with a presentation of several residential projects. She describes her goal as invigorating the...
Joe Day Blow X Blow-clip_4144
Joe Day defends the right of people to project their meanings upon the installation, and his freedom to develop a formal logic...
Joe Day Blow X Blow-clip_4146
Day and Moss turn to the analytic diagrams of museums and prisons, "Collections and Corrections," on the surrounding walls. This...
Jorge Silvetti-clip_5490
Jorge Silvetti discusses their ongoing work in South Park in Manhattan, which is located in a rare horizontally organized section...
Frank Israel And Josh Schweitzer Pacific...
Israel describes some of his residential projects, such as the penthouse of Liberty Tower in New York, which he tried to contrast...
Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call...
Silvetti discusses the tower proposed for Leonforte, which through optical devices and architectural tools, would frame views of...

Margaret Griffin-clip_3823

View the Full Video: Margaret Griffin
November 12, 2010 | Video Lecturer:

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Griffin continues her lecture with a presentation of
several residential projects. She describes her goal as invigorating the residential context. She discusses site constraints and strategies to expand the impression of volume within a small plot and minimal footprint. She discusses exploiting the interface between view and programmatic organization to intensify movement through the architecture. She illustrates this with projects that frame different views, draw visitors through the space, and connect the interior and exterior.


Joe Day Blow X Blow-clip_4144

View the Full Video: Joe Day Blow X Blow
November 6, 2009 | Video Lecturer: ,

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Joe Day defends the right of people to project their meanings upon the installation, and his freedom to develop a formal logic without any function. This leads to a discussion of the built form of the installation, contrasted with the projected imagery. Moss questions Day on his choice of material, and the two discuss the role of color in the space. Day relates the controlling of a point of view in a cinema to that of a museum and prison, as illustrated by the diagrammatic work displayed on the walls.


Joe Day Blow X Blow-clip_4146

View the Full Video: Joe Day Blow X Blow
November 6, 2009 | Video Lecturer: ,

Subclip

Day and Moss turn to the analytic diagrams of museums and prisons, “Collections and Corrections,” on the surrounding walls. This leads to a discussion of Jean-Paul Sartre’s argument that only prisoners enjoy the ultimate freedom from all responsibilities. They conclude by addressing the idea of scripting, both as a cinematographic tactic and a design tool utilized in the organization of “Blow X Blow.”


Jorge Silvetti-clip_5490

View the Full Video: Jorge Silvetti
March 12, 1997 | Video Lecturer:

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Jorge Silvetti discusses their ongoing work in South Park in Manhattan, which is located in a rare horizontally organized section of the island. The main challenge of the project was to provide a monumental user experience while incorporating the given program of a fast food restaurant and public bathrooms. Pursuing his interest in the colossal, Silvetti views the park as the site of a colossus.


Frank Israel And Josh Schweitzer Pacific Overtures-clip_4247

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Israel describes some of his residential projects, such as the penthouse of Liberty Tower in New York, which he tried to contrast to the Manhattan landscape below. In Robert Altman’s house in Malibu and other houses with great views, Israel tries to make a relationship with the view. Israel maintains that in L. A. it’s important to properly orient the view, the fireplace and the TV in the bedroom.


Jorge Silvetti Architectural Space Let’s Call Things By Their Rightful Name-clip_4151

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Silvetti discusses the tower proposed for Leonforte, which through optical devices and architectural tools, would frame views of civic and historic sites throughout town. The tower was inspired by an existing monumental fountain, which provided a viewpoint which unified the fragmented site. Silvetti advises dealing with buildings as they are and how they function, and putting architecture to work creatively, without relying on other media or other arts.